Preserved Stories Blog


Beware when trying to cross east to west on the north side of Lake Shore Blvd. West at Park Lawn in Humber Bay Shores

The sign is posted near the corner of Forty First St. and James St. in Long Branch. The view is toward Marie Curtis Park looking west along James St. Jaan Pill photo

The sign is posted near the corner of Forty First St. and James St. in Long Branch. The view is toward Marie Curtis Park looking west along James St. Jaan Pill photo

I have shared the following message (and the photo on the right) with the Long Branch Neighbourhood Watch Facebook page.

I share it with readers of the Preserved Stories website as well, in the event there may be one or two site visitors who might be interested.

My Facebook comment:

I am pleased there is a measure of interest in the topic of survival on the streets – whether in the role of pedestrian, driver, or cyclist.

My comment concerns Humber Bay Shores. This is a ways east of Long Branch. Thus if you do not wish to hear about topics related to other parts of Toronto, stop reading now.

Anyway, as I was saying (if you are still reading), I recently went to Park Lawn Road and Lake Shore Blvd. West to take some photos of the former Mr. Christie’s site. I crossed (in my role as a pedestrian) at the corner of Lake Shore Blvd. West and Park Lawn, on the north side. That crossing went well.

On the way back from my photo session, I stopped at the northeast corner of Park Lawn and Lake Shore. I was planning to cross Park Lawn walking west at the stop light. The light turned green. The little white pedestrian logo appeared across the street.

I was about to step forward and proceed across the street. However, I make it a habit to look to my left, under such conditions. Just as I looked to my left, a car car barrelling around the corner, heading from the east along Lake Shore and made the turn at Park Lawn without a second thought.

The fact that a pedestrian was about to cross the street was as far from the consciousness of the driver, as the recent rise in the price of coffee. The driver would not have cared less. Had I not stopped to ponder, whether or not the way was clear for me to cross, I would not be writing this note today. I would be one more statistic, another pedestrian wiped out at a crossing in Toronto.

Subsequent post

A subsequent post is entitled:

Left-hand turns from Lake Shore to Long Branch Ave. and to Thirty Seventh present characteristic hazards

 

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