Preserved Stories Blog

Etobicoke Creek thousands of years ago gave rise to what is now an underwater valley

At a presentation I attended in Mississauga of an underwater valley — now located south of teh current shoreline of Lake Ontario — associated with an earlier stage in the history of Etobicoke Creek.

We know from geological evidence that, during its Glacial Lake Iroquois stage, the water level of Lake Ontario was higher than it is now.

There’s a road in Oakville, north of the Queen Elizabeth Way at Trafalgar Road, that is conveniently named Iroquois Shore Road. The road indicates where the Glacial Lake Iroquois shoreline used to be located. Evidence of the shoreline is visible across Mississauga and Toronto as well.

For example, the old shoreline is indicated by a hill that one encounters when travelling north along Avenue Road or Yonge Street when approaching St. Clair Avenue West. Similarly a hill, with a less abrupt slope is encountered, as I recall, in Mississauga when travelling north along Hurontario Street north of Dundas Street West.

An excellent account of the rise and fall of this lake is provided by John Chapman and Donald Putnam in their classic and authoritative text, Physiography of Southern Ontario, 3rd Edition (1984).

Thereafter, the water level went much lower than it is now, during what is called the Lake Admiralty phase of Lake Ontario.

During the time Lake Ontario was at a lower level, Etobicoke Creek formed a valley which is now underwater.

I look forward to learning details about this valley

In an earlier version of this blog, I wrote:

“The map below, which I’ve created to show the configuration of Etobicoke Creek in the years before and after it was channelized, provides useful information concerning the direction in which the creek would likely have flowed during the thousands of years when the water level of the lake was lower than its current level.”

The text above is based on an incorrect assumption on my part.

That is, it’s not likely that the creek has flowed in a westerly direction for thousands of years. In fact, as I understand, the flow might have been in all manner of directions over such a period of time.

We owe thanks to Robert Lansdale for sharing the fact — based on his knowledge as an engineer with direct experience with the physical features of Lake Ontario — that one cannot make the assumption that I have made in the above-noted earlier version of my text.

Robert Lansdale notes that Etobicoke Creek and the surrounding lands have changed drastically over thousands — and even hundreds — of years.

“The spit where Lake Promenade and the cottages were located,” he comments, “was mostly created via sand being dumped in this area from the Lake Ontario beach currents, such as from the Sunnyside areas and easterly. That’s what most likely caused the creek to have become diverted. ”

 

Configuration of Etobicoke Creek prior to its channelization

 

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Links related to coastal erosion due to sea level rise in Prince Edward Island

Recently I’ve checked out some links related to coastal erosion due to sea level rise in Prince Edward Island. For your interest, a selection of the links includes:

http://shipsforcanada.ca/our-stories/understanding-sea-level-rise-and-coastal-erosion

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Prince Edward Island. Jaan Pill photo

http://www.rcinet.ca/en/2016/12/09/climate-change-and-p-e-i-s-slow-disappearance/

https://www.thestar.com/business/2015/11/14/prince-edward-island-coastal-real-estate-and-the-impact-of-climate-change.html

IMG_3340

Prince Edward Island. Jaan Pill photo

http://projects.upei.ca/climate/2014/06/09/is-your-coastal-property-at-risk-from-rising-sea-levels-and-coastal-erosion/

https://www.canadiangeographic.ca/article/adam-fenech-peis-rising-sea-levels

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/prince-edward-island/victoria-by-the-sea-shoreline-1.2700789

A 130-metre-wide waterfall drains meltwater from the Nansen Ice Shelf into the ocean. Image: Stuart Rankin via Flickr. The image is from the April 22, 2017 Climate News Network article mentioned at the page you are now reading.

A 130-metre-wide waterfall drains meltwater from the Nansen Ice Shelf into the ocean.
Image: Stuart Rankin via Flickr. The image is from the April 22, 2017 Climate News Network article mentioned at the page you are now reading.

Lidar imaging technology

Some of the links mention lidar technology, which I’ve also discussed at previous posts in other contexts:

I have updated an earlier post about the use of the lidar device in archaeological research

In a matter of days, a lidar device mounted on a Cessna can discover archaeological sites that would otherwise require years of research to locate

Updates

A Jan. 26, 2017 Yale Environment 360 article is entitled: “How the World Passed a Carbon Threshold and Why It Matters.”

An April 15, 2017 American Geophysical Union article is entitled: “How the Disappearing Arctic Ice is Already Changing Your Weather.”

An April 22, 2017 Climate News Network article is entitled: “Surface of Antarctica swimming with water.”

An April 24, 2017 CBC article is entitled: “Arctic climate warming higher and faster than expected: Open water in Arctic Ocean affecting weather patterns around world.”

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Mindfulness class helped women not men: this is a Brown University research conclusion where caveats apply

I have recently posted the following tweet:

Having posted the tweet, I will at this post offer a more extensive commentary.

As I have note elsewhere, I am a beginner practitioner of mindfulness.

The Brown University research report refers to interiority and exteriority as it relates to females and males, respectively. As I understand, the research report concludes that men are better off with Tai Chi and yoga than with learning mindfulness meditation.

The purpose of the current post is to present anecdotal evidence (my own) in favour of the argument that, in some cases, men will benefit big-time from mindfulness meditation.

I attended a mindfulness-based meditation course in Toronto over a decade ago. My reason for attending such a course was simple. I was responding to stress with an autonomic nervous system response that I was convinced was heading me toward a heart attack.

The response can be characterized as an expression of anger. It’s a form, we can say, of exteriorizing of stress. I was working as a public school teacher at the time.

Had I focused on Tai Chi or yoga, in my role as a male, instead of focusing on learning to practise mindfulness, I would not have learned to short-circuit that response to classroom stress that was bothering me (hugely) over a decade ago. After taking an eight-week Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) course, I learned a simple way to handle stress in my day-to-day work as a classroom teacher.

I learned that if I could focus, for one or two seconds at a time, on my breathing, I could short-circuit all of the stress-response escalation that otherwise would have automatically occurred  – that is, through the operation of the autonomic nervous system – and without further thought, in typical classroom situations. As the months and years went by, I got better and better at short-circuiting thois stress response. I kept careful records, in order to keep track of my progress. I had no idea whether the MBSR course would help me, but I was willing to give it a try. I was an attentive and conscientious student.

People’s brains are wired in particular ways. Given the neuroplasticity of the human brain, the wiring can be changed. Some years earlier, also with expert instruction (which is essential – along with hard work), I had rewired my brain in still another way. Neuroplasticity is a remarkable feature of brain functioning.

Addressing the issue of stress responses among public school teachers

Had I spent however many hours practising Tai Chi or yoga, which are great pursuits for anybody to practise, for reasons that relate among other things to flexibility and one’s sense of balance, I would not have achieved this feat, of being to turn off my anger at will and to focus on the present moment, in my day-to-day work as a teacher. What a feat that was, when I first learned to apply this skill.

I am not perfect nor do I claim to be but I have made huge progress as a human being, because I have learned, and have conscientiously applied, techniques associated with the practice of mindfulness meditation. I would not have learned these skills practising yoga or tai Chi, valuable as such practices are.

Thus I disagree strongly with the statement, in the above-noted research report from Brown University, that men should stick to yoga and Tai Chi and say good-bye to mindfulness meditation.

 

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Posted in Autobiography Stories - J. Pill, Newsletter, Toronto | 1 Comment

MP Borys Wrzesnewskyj (Etobicoke Centre) spoke most eloquently at the April 19, 2017 GTAA Air Traffic Noise meeting

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Many speakers were lined up during the second half of the April 19, 2017 CENAC meeting, including MP Borys Wrzesnewskyj (Etobicoke Centre) (at head of the line, in black T-shirt). Jaan Pill photo

A previous post is entitled:

Message from Lakeshore Planning Council regarding air traffic noise in Markland Woods, Alderwood, and Long Branch

I attended part of the April 19, 2017 Community Environment and Noise Advisory Committee (CENAC) meeting at the GTAA Administration Building at 3111 Convair Drive in Mississauga.

The previous post (above) features key information from the meeting.

The CENAC meeting was scheduled for 5:30 pm – 7:30 pm on April 19, 2017.

I was at the meeting from 6:00 pm until 7:00 pm.

A subsequent post will share a text of remarks by MP Borys Wrzesnewskyj (Etobicoke Centre). Jaan Pill photo

A subsequent post will share a text of remarks by MP Borys Wrzesnewskyj (Etobicoke Centre). Jaan Pill photo

I did no attend the entire meeting. There likely were many additional displays of eloquence at the meeting, but I was not there to witness them.

Public relations

What I did cover, by way of recording and taking of pictures and videos, was most interesting.

It was a tale of public relations, storytelling, messaging, and story management.

All of the content – and the context – was of much interest to me.

One of the events at the evening, or at any rate of the part of it that I attended, that really caught my attention, was a commentary delivered by Borys Wrzesnewskyj, Member of Parliament for Etobicoke Centre. He spoke really well. He shared a powerful message.

The meeting had an exceptionally good turnout. Jaan Pill photo

The meeting had an exceptionally good turnout. Jaan Pill photo

For a subsequent post I will transcribe Borys Wrzesnewskyj’s observations and share the text of his remarks (and a response from the CENAC Committee).  I will also share other highlights from the part of the meeting that I attended.

My main task, this week, however, is to put together a series of posts based on a great – and most eloquent – talk by Michael Etherington, Manager of Culture Programs, Native Canadian Centre Toronto, at an April 18, 2017 event highlighted at a previous post:

Was very impressed with Indigenous Cultural Competency Training session on April 18, 2017 at Mississauga Valley Community Centre

Detail from CENAC display panels outside the GTAA Administation Building meeting room. Jaan Pill photo

Detail from CENAC display panels outside the GTAA Administation Building meeting room. Jaan Pill photo

Thus it remains to be seen how much of the air traffic noise story I will get around to sharing.

Greater Toronto Airports Authority

A CENAC public relations display, which I found of much interest, was set up at the GTAA Administration Building, where the CENAC meeting was held.

CENAC is an acronym for the Community Environment and Noise Advisory Committee.

GTAA is the Greater Toronto Airports Authority.

Around 6:00 pm on April 19, 2017 a CBC television crew was assembled outside of the GTAA Administration Building. Jaan Pill photo

Around 6:00 pm on April 19, 2017 a CBC television crew was assembled outside of the GTAA Administration Building. Jaan Pill photo

A great resource, for getting up to speed on topics that are connected with noise and environment issues related to the airport is a page entitled Toronto Pearson Airport – GTAA at the website for Ward 3, City of Mississauga Councillor Chris Fonseca.

Mississauga’s connection to the history of aviation

According to online sources, most of Pearson Airport is in Mississauga; a small portion of it is in Toronto.

Mississauga has much aviation history associated with it – going back a century to the days of the Long Branch Aerodrome, Canada’s first aerodrome, which despite its name was not in Long Branch but rather in Toronto Township, which is now known as Lakeview in Mississauga.

You can read more about the Long Branch Aerodrome at the following posts among others:

History of Long Branch

The April 19, 2017 Air Traffic Noise meeting was held at the GTAA Administration Building at the Toronto Pearson International Airport. Jaan Pill photo

The April 19, 2017 Air Traffic Noise meeting was held at the GTAA Administration Building at the Toronto Pearson International Airport. Jaan Pill photo

“Y” Squadron air crew, Long Branch Aerodrome, May 27, 1917

Update

A late-April 2017 CTV news report is entitled: “Runway construction at Pearson leads to ground delays.”

Click on photos to enlarge them; click again to enlarge them further

The image is from an April 18, 2017 article at the website of the Markland Wood Homeowners Association; the link for the article is at one of the comments at the end of the post you are now reading.

The image, with a focus on Runway 05-23, is from an April 18, 2017 article at the website of the Markland Wood Homeowners Association; the link for the article is at one of the comments at the end of the post you are now reading.

Screenshot of Google Map view of Markland Wood

Screenshot of Google Map view of Markland Wood. Click on the image to enlarge it.

 

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Posted in Long Branch, Mississauga, Newsletter, Story management, Toronto | 2 Comments

We have a question regarding archives, files, photos, etc. regarding MCHS grad Peter Parsons

The following message is concerned with an Malcolm Campbell High School (MCHS) 2015 page entitled:

Students and Staff Who Have Passed Away

We have the following question at the MCHS Grads Facebook page:

Louise Gaudette writes:

“I am sorry to hear about all classmates who have passed. I just went to the Preserved stories list and noticed Peter Parsons’ name. I am a ’71 grad, but knew Peter well for a time. Jaan,  if you have anyone in your files/archives I could contact about Peter, I would really appreciate it. Thanks/Merci.”

[End]

If you have any archives files, photos related to MCHS grad Peter Parsons, please contact me through this website or by email at jpill@preservedstories.com.

 

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Posted in MCHS 2015 Reunion, Newsletter | 3 Comments

Message from Lakeshore Planning Council regarding air traffic noise in Markland Wood, Alderwood, and Long Branch

Screenshot of Google Map view of Markland Wood

Screenshot of Google Map view of Markland Wood. Click on the image to enlarge it.

The Lakeshore Planning Council has on April 19, 2017 shared the following message:

We signed in for the Community Environment and Noise Advisory Committee (CENAC) meeting this evening [April 19, 2017] and obtained the following information.

(1) Use of the Pearson North/South runway, which has precipitated recent aircraft noise over Alderwood and Long Branch, is TEMPORARY, due to construction on runways which is scheduled during APRIL and MAY.

The construction, and therefore the recent aircraft noise, will cease during the SUMMER months, and be continued in the Fall (October) to complete the construction work.

There are no current plans or discussions to make the aircraft re-routing over South Etobicoke permanent.

(2) If you would like to track specific aircraft flying over South Etobicoke communities, go to

https://www.torontopearson.com/en/noisecomplaint/##

and click on WebTrak. Launch Webtrak and this provides a map showing specific moving aircraft. Moving your mouse over the aircraft gives info concerning the aircraft. There is a delay of about 10 minutes between the aircraft leaving the airport and then appearing on the map.

(3) If you would like to read reports, minutes of meetings of CENAC, and agendas for upcoming meetings, go back to

https://www.torontopearson.com/en/noisecomplaint/##

and on the menu on the left-hand side of the page click on CENAC (scroll down the page a little).

(4) Finally, there is a vacancy for a Toronto resident to be a member of the CENAC Board, if anyone is interested.

Hope this clarifies.

[End]

Updates from Jaan Pill

I attended part of the CENAC meeting at the GTAA building at the airport on April 19, 2017. It was a standing-room-only meeting. I will write a separate post about it.

A late-April 2017 CTV news report is entitled: “Runway construction at Pearson leads to ground delays.”

 

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Posted in Long Branch, Mississauga, Newsletter, Toronto | 2 Comments

Tactics, strategy, and logistics drive the management of organized violence

When we speak of military leadership we are speaking of the management of organized violence.

A random thought, that has occurred to me, concerns the inter-connectedness of all things.

What follows are some additional, accumulated random thoughts.

Vladimir Putin and Erving Goffman

I have a keen interest in the discussion in Mr. Putin: Operative in the Kremlin (2015) regarding Mr. Putin’s conceptualization of what strategy entails. In the latter’s formulation, strategy means planning for the unexpected – that is, planning for contingencies. It does not mean having a step-by-step long-term plan for moving a particular project forward.

Mr. Putin (2015) outlines the formative experiences that have given rise to the latter’s particular understanding – and blindspots in relation to such an understanding – of economics, Europe, and the United States.

The book also discusses the relevance of such understandings, and misperceptions, as they relate to policy decisions related to current circumstances.

This is a highly valuable, well-organized, well-written book, which has the capability of giving rise to many insights.

An underlying concept, as I’ve been reading the above-noted Brookings Institution study regarding Mr. Putin, that I have kept in mind is the dramaturgical perspective, regarding the dynamics of social interactions, that has been outlined by the Canadian social psychologist, Erving Goffman.

Goffman’s formulations regarding how situations are defined are as relevant in the current era, as they were when he first shared his observations.

Tactics, strategy, and logistics

A related topic concerns the history of logistics, which I will save for a future post. Tactics, strategy, and logistics all go together – in military history, in business, in political life, in whatever project you can think of.

My own understanding of the role of strategy is based on my experience with community self-organizing projects in Canada and elsewhere. Over several decades, I’ve benefited from the strategic advice of many people whose experience vastly exceeds my own. Even a person with little experience can make a big difference, I have learned, if a person is willing to listen to sound advice that others can provide.

Logistics as a driving force in international relations

Logistics serves as a driving force in international relations. My reading, with regard to logistics, has focused on a study by Deborah Cowen entitled The Deadly Life of Logistics: Mapping Violence in Global Trade (2014). The latter book is only available as a Reference copy at the Toronto Public Library; however, at the Mississauga Library System a Circulating copy is available.

The Story of Mississauga

As I’ve noted at a previous post, I have been following with interest the Story of Mississauga.

The Story of Mississauga is focused on story management as viewed from the perspective of heritage management.

I’ve been following the evolving planning process for the Story of Mississauga for some time. The concept of developing a story for an entire city appeals to me hugely. What a great concept!

I do have one additional random thought. In the event the Story of Mississauga makes for “better citizens,” that is not exciting at all, except for bureaucratic story managers, whose conception of what civic engagement entails is vague if not nonexistent. On the other hand, if the Story of Mississauga turns out to be (along the lines of The Moth (2015)) extraordinary, based upon solid evidence, and surprising, then I will buy it, for sure.

 

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Posted in Mississauga, Newsletter, Story management, Toronto | 1 Comment

The context is the content

This post concerns three books:

The Moth, First Edition (2014)

Mr. Putin: Operative in the Kremlin (2015)

Secondhand Time: The Last of the Soviets, First U.S. Edition. (2016)

Each of these books focuses – with a high level of skill and originality – on the context of people’s lives and formative experiences, and the context within which their stories are best managed.

Context matters more than content. To say it another way (with a nod here to Marshall McLuhan), the context is the content.

The Moth (2014)

The first book, The Moth (2014), features stories built around the same theme: Keep it short and present non-fiction content that is extraordinary, based upon solid evidence, and surprising.

I can think of many systems of communications that do not follow such a format. It takes a focused effort, and a strong sense of strategy, to organize and maintain such a theme. As with any framework, there are strengths and limitations in such a model. The limitation is that a formula is a formula.

The format, in this case, creates the specified context, within which a given Moth story is experienced by the reader or the audience.

I am very impressed with this book, as well as with the two other books that are the focus of the current post.

Mr. Putin (2015)

I have already written a couple of posts about Mr. Putin: Operative in the Kremlin (2015):

Mr. Putin (2015) illustrates that story management is possible even in the absence of evidence-based biographical details

An exemplary study in story management: Mr. Putin: Operative in the Kremlin (2015)

In a future post, I’ll continue my discussion about this study, which is based upon a format developed by the Brookings Institution.

The latter organization plays a role that is in some respects similar to, but in other key respects is distinct from, a typical academic institution.

Secondhand Time (2016)

I have also been avidly reading Secondhand Time: The Last of the Soviets, First U.S. Edition. (2016). I became interested in the book in particular after its author, Svetlana Alexievich, won the 2015 Nobel Prize in Literature. I had borrowed some of her other books from the Toronto Public Library but had not begun a close reading of her work, until now.

I have long had an interest in the theory and practice of oral history. Over the years, I’ve recorded many hours of oral history as it relates to life stories in the Greater Toronto Area and elsewhere in the world. I’ve also read many studies dealing with recording and publishing (and broadcasting/podcasting) of oral histories. What I’ve learned, from reading Secondhand Time (2016), has vastly advanced my understanding of what oral histories are about, and how they can best be presented, for the benefit of the reader or the audience.

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Smoke Signals (1998) is adapted from a short story in The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven (1994)

Dream Catcher in window at Aboriginal Resource Centre at Humber College. Artist: Brian Klyne

Dream Catcher in window at Aboriginal Resource Centre at Humber College. Artist: Brian Klyne

I have an interest in learning about the First Nations history of Long Branch (Toronto not New Jersey).

The human story of the area, where I have lived for 20 years, began about 10,000 years ago when Palaeo-Indian nomadic hunters first arrived in Southern Ontario at the end of the last Ice Age.

After the arrival of European settlers in Long  Branch, most of the forests that had existed for 10,000 years in the area were soon gone.

I  seek to get a sense of the context for the story that began at the end of the last Ice Age. I know for sure that histories written in the tradition of the European settler societies, however valuable they may be, will not give me as good a sense of the First Nations story. I need, instead, to learn from Indigenous sources. It’s taken me many years to realize that I have to take steps, on my own, to become educated in ways that will, of necessity, be new for me.

Artist" Philip Cote

Wall display at Aboriginal Resource Centre, Humber College Lakeshore. Artist: Philip Cote

On April 13, 2017 I had the good fortune to attend a screening of Smoke Signals (1998) at the Aboriginal Resource Centre at the new Humber College Lakeshore Student Welcome and Resource Centre at the corner of Kipling Ave. and Lake Shore Blvd. West in New Toronto.

The film, which has received highly positive reviews, is based on a short story by Sherman Alexie, “This is What it Means to Say Phoenix, Arizona,” from The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven (1994).

I look forward to reading the latter book, as well as a Blasphemy: [new and selected stories] 1st ed. (2012) by the same author.

I also look forward to attending future events at the Aboriginal Resource Centre.

My approach to the study of the First Nations experience is straighforward. I want to begin by acquainting myself with the work of Indigenous authors and filmmakers.

I am pleased that such an opportunity is available, through sources such as the Aboriginal Resource Centre on the third floor of the Humber College Lakeshore Campus.

Jaan Pill photo

Floor display – “Turtle Island”

Smoke Signals (1998)

A blurb at the Rotten Tomatoes website sums up the story succinctly: “The unavoidable synopsis – two young American Indians leave the reservation to resolve their problems and to find themselves – belies the poetry of this well-acted, well-directed and largehearted movie.”

I much enjoyed the movie. The dialogue at the start was a delight, to my ears. It took hold of my attention. I was getting the perspective of a non-settler take on the meaning of life in North America. That was a good experience for me. The dialogue worked well all the way through. The story was put together beautifully; it had a good pace, the characters came to life. The journey depicted in the film – and the ending – made sense. I’m really pleased I saw the film.

The people I met at the event were welcoming and ensured that, as a newcomer, I felt right at ease. The snacks were great, as well. In every way, it’s a great setting to watch a movie, with a focus on a First Nations perspective on the experiences of life that all of us share.

Screening room at Aboriginal Resource Centre

Screening room at Aboriginal Resource Centre

I look forward to continuing on my own journey, of learning about things that I had only thought about getting around to learning, until recently. I want to learn more about the story – and the context of the story – of the previous 10,000 years of Long Branch, Southern Ontario, and the rest of the world. And I want to better understand how that story relates to the here and now of the challenges facing us as a Planet.

Updates

An April 17, 2017 CBC article is entitled: “‘It scares me’: Permafrost thaw in Canadian Arctic sign of global trend: Buildings in Inuvik being demolished because of shaky foundations.”

An April 23, 2017 Big Think article is entitled: “Discovery of North America’s Oldest Settlement Proves Native Canadian Legend True.”

 

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Posted in Long Branch, Newsletter, Toronto | 1 Comment

Noise complaints regarding increased aircraft traffic Alderwood, Long Branch, and Markland Wood; meeting on April 19, 2017

Updates

Please refer to more recent posts:

Message from Lakeshore Planning Council regarding air traffic noise in Markland Wood, Alderwood, and Long Branch

MP Borys Wrzesnewskyj (Etobicoke Centre) spoke most eloquently at the April 19, 2017 GTAA Air Traffic Noise meeting

A late-April 2017 CTV news report is entitled: “Runway construction at Pearson leads to ground delays.”

 

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I have received the following message by email, and have also read about this topic at a “Long Branch Development” Facebook Page.

Message regarding increased aircraft traffic over Alderwood and Long Branch reads as follows:

You probably have noticed that the airplane traffic and noise has increased lately and there are plans by the GTAA to have planes fly over our houses for 2 weekends a month and 2 nights a week all night permanently.

Anyways there is a number/email you can contact to register your complaints. This is basically how the air traffic has been rerouted to our neighbourhood because other neighbourhoods complained loudly.

https://www.torontopearson.com/en/noisecomplaint/#

There is also a big meeting scheduled for April 19th to address the issue, I am not sure of the details.

There is also a Facebook page “Alderwood Airplane Noise”:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/283181248789297/

[End]

[The comments below serve to round out some of what is known, regarding this topic]

Meeting on April 19, 2017

For details, here’s a link:

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10211211769662570&set=p.10211211769662570&type=3&theater

Updates

An April 2017 (not clear about exact date) CBC article is entitled: “Planes diverted around Toronto skies while Canada’s busiest runway gets a facelift: East-west Runway 05-23 will be closed for repairs until mid-May.”

An April 16, 2017 CBC article is entitled: “Toronto homeowners cash out of hot real estate market amid uncertainty: Agent says some buyers are delaying purchases in anticipation of possible fixes.”

 

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Posted in Long Branch, Newsletter, Toronto | 12 Comments

Toronto Preservation Board to consider designation of the historic Blue Goose Public House (Windsor House) in Mimico on April 20, 2017

Windsor Public House - established 1909 - renamed the Blue Goose Tavern in 1971. Source: Historic photos from around Mimico, Toronto

Windsor Public House – established 1909 – renamed the Blue Goose Tavern in 1971. Source:
Historic photos from around Mimico, Toronto

The following information is from a person who is a source of reliable information:

The Toronto Preservation Board will consider the designation of the historic Blue Goose Public House in Mimico at its meeting on April 20, 2017.

The link to the item is below:

Re: Inclusion on City of Toronto Heritage Registry – 1 Blue Goose St.

If you wish to submit a comment of support please click the “submit comments” button at the top of the page. You can use some of the language in the staff report for your comments and any personal anecdotes of your use of this historic Mimico building.

It has been noted that the proposed development of this site is more sympathetic than what happened further north on Audley Street where a developer began demolition of the building as the Toronto Preservation Board was deliberating on its designation (they did have a demolition permit however).

The proposal for this site is to restore the Windsor Public House and the developer has hinted that a brew pub will be opened in the basement and main floor. A row of townhouses around the building are also proposed.

Details can be found here:

1 Blue Goose St. application

click on “supporting documentation” to see the submission files. They can be downloaded.

 

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