Preserved Stories Blog

Etobicoke Creek thousands of years ago gave rise to what is now an underwater valley

At a presentation I attended in Mississauga of an underwater valley — now located south of teh current shoreline of Lake Ontario — associated with an earlier stage in the history of Etobicoke Creek.

We know from geological evidence that, during its Glacial Lake Iroquois stage, the water level of Lake Ontario was higher than it is now.

There’s a road in Oakville, north of the Queen Elizabeth Way at Trafalgar Road, that is conveniently named Iroquois Shore Road. The road indicates where the Glacial Lake Iroquois shoreline used to be located. Evidence of the shoreline is visible across Mississauga and Toronto as well.

For example, the old shoreline is indicated by a hill that one encounters when travelling north along Avenue Road or Yonge Street when approaching St. Clair Avenue West. Similarly a hill, with a less abrupt slope is encountered, as I recall, in Mississauga when travelling north along Hurontario Street north of Dundas Street West.

An excellent account of the rise and fall of this lake is provided by John Chapman and Donald Putnam in their classic and authoritative text, Physiography of Southern Ontario, 3rd Edition (1984).

Thereafter, the water level went much lower than it is now, during what is called the Lake Admiralty phase of Lake Ontario.

During the time Lake Ontario was at a lower level, Etobicoke Creek formed a valley which is now underwater.

I look forward to learning details about this valley

In an earlier version of this blog, I wrote:

“The map below, which I’ve created to show the configuration of Etobicoke Creek in the years before and after it was channelized, provides useful information concerning the direction in which the creek would likely have flowed during the thousands of years when the water level of the lake was lower than its current level.”

The text above is based on an incorrect assumption on my part.

That is, it’s not likely that the creek has flowed in a westerly direction for thousands of years. In fact, as I understand, the flow might have been in all manner of directions over such a period of time.

We owe thanks to Robert Lansdale for sharing the fact — based on his knowledge as an engineer with direct experience with the physical features of Lake Ontario — that one cannot make the assumption that I have made in the above-noted earlier version of my text.

Robert Lansdale notes that Etobicoke Creek and the surrounding lands have changed drastically over thousands — and even hundreds — of years.

“The spit where Lake Promenade and the cottages were located,” he comments, “was mostly created via sand being dumped in this area from the Lake Ontario beach currents, such as from the Sunnyside areas and easterly. That’s what most likely caused the creek to have become diverted. ”

 

Configuration of Etobicoke Creek prior to its channelization

 

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Posted in Jane's Walk, Long Branch | Leave a comment

The Mississauga meme has been: “No Tall Towers on the Lake” – will the meme survive?

This post concerns a well-attended community meeting, featuring many lively discussions, held at the Waterside Inn in Port Credit on Nov. 21, 2017.

The meeting concerned the next steps for redevelopment of a stretch of Port Credit waterfront.

This post also concerns memes.

A meme can be defined as an idea, behaviour, or style that spreads from person to person within a culture. I’m using a definition that I came across at an article highlighted at a previous post dated Jan. 13, 2014.

The community meeting on Nov. 21, 2017 in Port Credit was concerned with the development of the former Imperial Oil Lands at 70 Mississauga Road South.

As is noted at the City of Mississauga website, West Village Partners, the new owners of 70 Mississauga Road South, have prepared a draft master plan for the site.

June 8, 2017 community meeting

Port Credit Inspiration hosted a community meeting on June 8, 2017 where West Village Partners presented a version of a draft master plan.

Nov. 21, 2017 Port Credit community meeting concerned with development of former Imperial Oil Lands at 70 Mississauga Road South. Jaan Pill photo

Nov. 21, 2017 Port Credit community meeting concerned with development of former Imperial Oil Lands at 70 Mississauga Road South. Jaan Pill photo

I attended the above-noted meeting, as well as the subsequent community meeting that was held, regarding a draft master plan, on Nov. 21, 2017.

I recorded parts of both meetings and a long way down the road, I may get around to writing bout the ongoing planning process in more detail.

At this point, I’d like to share some quick points.

Good turnout

First, I was very impressed with the very impressive turnout, at both the June 8, 2017 and Nov. 21, 2017 meetings.

The level of involvement, by the local Port Credit community, is most impressive.

I also have the sense that in the ongoing community consultation as it relates to Inspiration Port Credit and Inspiration Lakeview, the alignment between rhetoric and reality, with regard to community consultation, is very close.

That stands in contrast to other communities where, in my experience, rhetoric and reality are far apart, at the end of the day.

Nov. 21, 2017 Port Credit community meeting concerned with development of former Imperial Oil Lands at 70 Mississauga Road South. Jaan Pill photo

Nov. 21, 2017 Port Credit community meeting concerned with development of former Imperial Oil Lands at 70 Mississauga Road South. Jaan Pill photo

The Mississauga meme has been: “No Tall Towers on the Lake” – will the meme survive the passage of the years?

Secondly, it has occurred to me that much of life, including political life, involves memes.

A standard meme in Mississauga, which I have shared at previous posts, is that politicians such as Ward 1 Councillor Jim Tovey and former mayor Hazel McCallion have often remarked that it’s characteristic of Toronto that you see a wall of tall condos facing Lake Ontario.

The corollary is that, in Mississauga, there are no tall towers on the Mississauga waterfront – and no plans to so place them, in the future.

The meme has, as I understand, become a point of pride among many residents of Mississauga.

As it happened, however, the June 8, 2017 meeting included a proposal to situate at least one tall condo at the waterfront.

That detail, at the meeting, really caught my attention.

My first thought was, “How could this be?”

I wondered, “How will the previous, great meme be retired from service? What alternative meme will be launched, in order to differentiate the City of Mississauga from the City of Toronto?

At the Nov. 21, 2017 meeting, one of the slides showed what the community consultations, in the prior years of community meetings, had arrived at, with regard to the proposed built form for the former former Imperial Oil Lands at 70 Mississauga Road South.

What you saw in the original concept was a cluster of medium-rise buildings located in the central area of a stretch of land extending from Lake Ontario to Lakeshore Road West. By the water, what you saw was a few slightly taller – but not overwhelmingly tall – buildings.

The concept presented by West Village Partners on Nov. 21, 2017, in contrast, had low-rise buildings in the centre of the stretch of land and a grouping of high-rise buildings (with one building at 26 storeys) very close to the lake.

That is to say, and these are my words, “Bye, Bye, Mississauga Meme.”

Nov. 21, 2017 Port Credit community meeting convened with

Nov. 21, 2017 Port Credit community meeting concerned with development of former Imperial Oil Lands at 70 Mississauga Road South. The image at the bottom of the slide shows a cluster of tall buildings next to the shoreline of Lake Ontario. Jaan Pill photo. Click on the image to enlarge it; click again to enlarge it further.

Not all tables summed up what they had discussed

For the past 40 years, I’ve been attending meetings, where people break into small groups, discuss a given topic for a specified period of time, and then arrange for a spokesperson from each group to report back to the group as a whole.

At the Nov. 21, 2017 meeting, I observed something that I have not observed before.

A number of tables declined to make a report to the group as a whole.

I wondered how this could happen.

I would speculate that the turnout at the meeting was so large, that some people simply did not wish to speak.

Or it may have been the case that at the start of the reports from the tables, it had been announced that the sharing of discussion topic, from each table, was optional.

I would not know. I missed the start of the reports from the tables, as I went for a walk during the 45 minutes that the table discussions proceeded.

At any rate, the written comments in the workbooks, which are part of the consultation process, are the key sources of input.

That is to say, if a table did not speak out, to share their conclusions with the meeting at large, their input would still be factored in, by way of written comments.

I also noted that some of the speakers appeared to be promoting their own personal views, in contrast to focusing on a report summing up all the views from a given table.

I recall, from a conference I attended years ago (in Banff, Alberta in August 1991), that one way to counter this tendency is for a facilitator to note, at the beginning of a table-discussion session, that sometimes it’s a great idea for a table to choose, as a spokesperson, a speaker who is not the most vocal person in the group.

In that way, you get a report from the table, that is possibly bound to be more broadly representative, of the group than the report by the most vocal person. That’s because the most vocal person is likely to focus on what she or he wants to get across, rather than what the group wants to get across.

That’s just a note in passing. The point is, that what a facilitator says, at the start of a table discussion, can have a huge impact on how the process is structured.

Another note in passing is that, in many table discussions, that I’ve attended, a planner or similar professional acts as a resource or facilitator, at each table. As a last resort, I think it would be a great idea if such a person were to act as a spokesperson, for a given table – especially in the case of a super large meeting, where no-one else at a table wants to engage in the act of public speaking.

Comments from the tables

The sound system at the meeting room at the Wayside Inn worked well. About the only problem was that, when the portable mic was held too close to a speaker’s mouth, there was a loss of intelligibility due to sound distortion. However, people figured out pretty quickly what the ideal distance from the mic was.

What follows is the first part  of an overview of the reports, based on my notes.

I may have missed a report or two, at the very beginning of the reports. As well as taking notes, I also recorded the speakers, but do not have time to check the recordings, as I write this overview.

At the point where I came in, a spokesperson was saying that, in her opinion, public parks should not have BBQs. She also said it was great to have taller buildings closer to the lake. They have, she noted, great views of the lake. She also said she would refer not to have stacked townhouses in the middle of the land, and added that schools for children would need to be addressed.

As I understand, traffic issues were not to be discussed, at this meeting

A second spokesperson said, “Everybody at our table wanted to talk about traffic issues,” despite the fact that the instructions, at the onset of the discussion, specified that traffic issues were not to be discussed.

The speaker also said that the table in question felt the Port Credit Heritage Conservation District should be isolated from the new development.

As well, he expressed the hope that the Waterfront Trail would be retained, as it serves a useful purpose, in particular for Cranberry Cove residents.

[Comment in passing: As a Toronto resident, I was delighted to hear about Cranberry Cove. It was my first encounter with the name.]

The spokesperson also said there was a concern about the number of condos that were mingled in the proposed campus area, but he added that the campus concept is, in itself, a good one.

Next speaker was not happy

The next speaker said he was not happy with the West Village Partners proposal.

He said: No Inspiration. No Vision.

He said the land in question is too valuable to throw away on knee-jerk design. He recommended an international design competition to design a park.

He said a ratio of 40 percent park and 60 percent residential would be good, rather than what was currently proposed.

He also objected to underground parking, and suggested that there be a Metrolinx link to the development.

Dislike of high towers

The next speaker spoke of his table’s dislike of the high towers in the proposal, as well as their proximity to the lake, and to the big move away from the original plan.

[That’s a paraphrase of what was said.]

He added it would be important for Non-West Village residents to feel welcome at the development. He spoke in support of integration “so we don’t have segregated neighbourhoods.”

He also referred, if I have this correct from my notes, to the scarcity of park land in the proposal.

To be continued

 

 

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Consultation on Laneway Housing – Nov. 30, 2017; starts 6:30 pm, Council Chamber, City Hall, 100 Queen Street West

I am pleased to share the following information from the website of City of Toronto Wad 6 Trinity-Spadina Councillor Joe Cressy

Laneway Suites- November 30 Community Consultation

Tucked away near the places we live, work and play are spaces that can often be forgotten.  Places that we can, together, creatively transform to help us enhance our vibrant neighbourhoods – laneways.  Our laneways offer opportunities at every turn.

Recently, the non-profit organization Lanescape and Evergreen prepared a report on laneway housing suites, and how they could be implemented in the Toronto and East York District. I agree that laneway housing presents an exciting opportunity to address our city’s affordable housing crisis. Now, we must ensure we are working together to develop a framework for laneway suites, and other laneway activations, together.

They presented their report to Toronto and East York Community Council, where we requested a formal study and review be conducted by our own Planning staff. City staff will now take the report that was done by the non-profits, and complete a formal study, including consultation with the public, to produce guidelines and criteria for how we can implement laneway housing. Our laneways are a tremendous untapped resource and they should and need to be activated. The question is what type of activation and on what laneway?

The City is holding a community consultation meeting at City Hall where you can learn more about the study, ask questions, and share your comments.

Meeting details:

Date: November 30, 2017
Time: 6:30 PM – 9:00 p.m.
Location: Council Chamber, City Hall, 100 Queen Street West

The consultation will begin with a presentation at 6:30 p.m. followed by an open house at 7:15pm where comments and questions can be provided directly to City Staff from a variety of City Divisions. Download the full meeting notice here.

 

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Posted in Committee of Adjustment & Local Appeal Body, Long Branch, Newsletter, Toronto | Leave a comment

When I visit the USA, I adopt the mindset of “the foreign correspondent”

Update

As noted in a comment at the end of this post, the flippant tone of my review of the Chicago Tribune “gentrification” article is perhaps not warranted.

Accordingly, a tentative bottom line that occurs to me, influenced by the preface by Richard J. Evans in the first of his three books – his trilogy – about Nazi Germany, is that a writer is best to keep to a minimum the moral and ethical “baggage” that can be brought to a writing task, in that way leaving it up to the reader to decide, in whichever way occurs to the reader, what the most appropriate way will be, for the reader to judge – in the context of morality, ethics, and the like – the information and details that a writer has shared.

[End]

 

Many people that I know in Toronto like to visit Buffalo.

I’ve been there a few times.

In previous years I wasn’t much interested in travelling to Buffalo but now I’m starting to see it can be a lot of fun – a visit to a foreign country.

On Sunday, Nov. 19, 2017 on my most recent visit, I enjoyed a stop at Wegmans at 651 Dick Road in Depew, NY.

Wegmans is a great place to do some shopping; the setting is cheerful and the food (assuming you choose wisely, of course) is good, and healthy. You can stop for a snack right in the store, paying for it at a cashier, leaving your cart full of groceries nearby while you eat, and before you proceed to a checkout.

IMG_7061

I noted that the warning-signage at the Wegmans parking lot and elsewhere is written in clearly worded declarative sentences often backed up by implicit or explicit references to the rule of law.

On a Sunday, the travel through customs went quickly, wherever it was that we crossed. (I wasn’t driving, so I didn’t pay attention.)

I would describe it as a cross-cultural experience. I like to approach a visit to the USA through “the eyes of a foreign correspondent.”

In fact, I like to approach events and happenings in Long Branch in Toronto, where I live, on the same terms.

I was especially interested in the magazine racks at Wegmans and bought two magazines – the November / December 2017 issue of Dwell: At Home in the Modern World; and the October 2017 issue of New York Spaces: The Home Design Magazine of Metropolitan New York. There’s a particular design project that I’m interested in and the magazines were helpful in getting me oriented with regard to it.

There’s a standard visual trope or meme that recurs in such magazines. The meme features an appealing view of untrammelled nature, as seen through a picture window of an artfully designed interior. I am reminded of the machine in the garden trope of postwar industrial land-use design.

Plus, I like to see print magazines that have a good business model, that enable them to survive, and reach a paying audience.

A cross-cultural experience

I also came across a copy of the Sunday (Nov. 19, 2017) edition of The Buffalo News. The front page of the Business Section of the latter paper gave readers notice that an article on Page G7 addressed a most intriguing topic, that is to say: “Exploding common myths about housing: Statistics uncover reality of gentrification, poverty and property values.”

On Nov. 19, 2017 we drove from Toronto to visit Wegmans on Dick Road in Depew, Ny and to visit Willamsville, where a fabled Talbots outlet is located. Jaan Pill photo

On Nov. 19, 2017 we drove from Toronto to visit Wegmans on Dick Road in Depew, NY and to visit Williamsville, NY where a fabled Talbots outlet is located. Jaan Pill photo

The article, from the Oct. 18, 2017 Chicago Tribune, is entitled: “3 housing myths, debunked: Poverty, property values, and gentrification.”

The opening paragraph notes that “as one grows more attached to a residence over the years, feelings often deepen as house becomes home and memories start to accumulate.”

Williamsville, NY. Jaan Pill photo

Williamsville, NY. Jaan Pill photo

Well, I would say that sometimes as the years pass, a person becomes less attached. It depends on the person, and the family.

The article notes, anyway, that “According to experts,” “myths abound” regarding “gentrification, poverty and low-income housing.”

Plaza at which the Talbots store in Williamsville, NY is located. Jaan Pill photo

Plaza at which a Talbots store in Williamsville, NY is located. Jaan Pill photo

First myth of gentrification, according to Oct. 18, 2017 Chicago Tribune article

“Myth 1: Gentrification has as much to do with morals as with economics,” the article notes, and adds that varied definitions exist regarding gentrification. An expert is quoted who asserts that gentrification “becomes sticky only when we assign moral weight to the term.”

Good to know.

The expert is quoted as attending to the relevance of the terms:

  • demarcation
  • devaluation
  • deterioration
  • demolition, and
  • defunding

The bottom line, if you follow the narration to its logical conclusion, is that gentrification carries no moral weight at all.

Having made quick work of the first myth, the text turns to the second on the list.

Second myth

“Myth 2: There is more poverty in cities than in suburbs.”

Statistics are referenced indicating the poverty has reared its head in the suburbs as well.

The house on the left in Williamsville, NY caught my eye. Jaan Pill photo

The house on the left in Williamsville, NY caught my eye. A resident that I spoke with said the house appears to be slated for demolition at some point down the road. Jaan Pill photo

An expert is quoted as observing: “I think we’re not aware of these trends in part because suburbs were created to be exclusive places … and therefore no suburb really wants to think they have a poverty problem, partly because it may require them to do something about it — but it also may affect their ability to maintain property values or to attract new homeowners.”

What’s interesting, the article adds, is that “poverty is as segregated in suburbs as it is in cities.”

As I understand from speaking with a local resident, this house dates from the early 1800s and belongs to a judge, who has made sure the interior is in great shape. Jaan Pill photo

As I understand from speaking with a local resident, this house dates from the early 1800s and belongs to a judge, who has made sure the interior is in great shape. Jaan Pill photo

How can poverty become a thing of the past both in cities and suburbs? Strengthen safety nets, the article says. That will solve the problem.

And we proceed to the third myth.

Third myth

“Myth 3: Having low-income housing in your community reduces property values.”

The topic is covered in a manner that is of interest. If you have an interest in learning about this myth, please refer to the Chicago Tribune article, at the conclusion of which you will be de-mystified.

This house caught my eye because it has an expressive quality to it. I like to think it was designed a long time ago, by an architect sitting at ab analog drafting table. Jaan Pill photo

This house caught my eye because it has an expressive quality to it. I like to think it was designed a long time ago, by an architect sitting at an old-time, analog drafting table. Jaan Pill photo

It’s an enjoyable article. I also bought a print edition of the Sunday New York Times. It’s a fun read but I do keep in mind that the paper acted as a “stenographer to power” during the run-up to the American invasion of Iraq. It’s one of those little things that I keep in mind, as I read the New York Times.

I like the way the stories are structured. They have a start, middle, and end and things do appear to fit into place well, my recollections about Iraq notwithstanding.

Sometimes, a copy of the Sunday edition is enough to keep me reading for several months. I like to make a close study of articles that I read, when I can. That takes time, and some concentration of attention. I like especially to consider how the stories are constructed, and how language is used to advance particular arguments or themes. The New York Times is a fun paper. There is much of value in the contents from what I can see.

Williamsville, NY

From Wegmans on Dick Road in Depew, NY, we next travelled to a fabled Talbot’s outlet in Williamsville, NY. You can save a lot of money by buying things online in Canada, and then going to the Talbots outlet to pick them up. If they don’d fit, you get a refund there and then, as I understand. (I don’t follow all the details.)

I had close to an hour to spare, as I was not involved with the in-store Talbot’s visit. This was my second visit to Williamsville. On this occasion, I walked along Main Street for some distance, stopping at some historic houses that caught my eye.

Group portrait of athletes, from the University of Tartu in Estonia, who attended the 1936 Berlin Olympics as student observers. The photo was taken, I believe, at the University of Tartu in 1936. Source: Kaljo Pill

Group portrait of athletes, from the University of Tartu in Estonia, who attended the 1936 Berlin Olympics as student observers. The photo was taken, I believe, in 1936 or earlier. Source: Kaljo Pill

I noted that many historic buildings in Williamsville have been repurposed for contemporary uses. I also learned that one old building, which in particular caught my eye, may be headed toward a tear-down as part of a new development.

I also learned, through a conversation with a local resident (who as often occurs, asked what I was doing with my camera) that another historic house, dating from the early 1800s, is fortunately not under threat, as a local judge has purchased it and is taking great care to fix up the interior.

What was I doing with my camera? I was a visitor from Toronto (you can tell by my accent) and I enjoy taking pictures of historic houses, wherever it is that I am travelling.

I do not know what kind of heritage preservation regime is in place in Williamsville, or elsewhere in New York state, but am keen to learn more.

Kaljo Pill, at age about 21. Detail from 1936 group photo of athletes from Estonia, who attended the 1936 Berlin Olympics as student observers. Source: Kaljo Pill

Kaljo Pill, age about 21. Detail from 1936 group photo of young athletes from Estonia, who attended the 1936 Berlin Olympics as student observers. Source: Kaljo Pill

I also walked along a residential area where one house in particular caught me eye, as it had an expressiveness about it – as if it had jumped off of an architect’s old-time drafting table to appear fully fleshed out, in its good-natured expressiveness, as a reality on the ground.

That house was designed using analog methods – as in drawings on a drafting table; I am relatively certain of that. It does not look like a house that an architectural technician (who is not an architect) would design using a software program, as perhaps has become standard practice in many places in the world today. (Some of those places include Long Branch, where I live now.)

Richard J. Evans

On the way to Buffalo and on my way back, I read three passages from three books, namely:

The Third Reich at War (2008) by Richard J. Evans, and two books on strength training,

Bigger, Faster, Stronger: The Proven System for Developing Athletes (2017) by Ken Shepard and Kim Gross; and

Eat. Lift. Thrive (2017) by Sohee Lee

I’ve been reading all three of Richard J. Evans’ trilogy of books about Nazi Germany – focusing upon the coming to power of the regime; the years it was in power up to 1939; and its conduct in wartime –  as well as several other books addressing several related themes. I began an intensive process of focused reading of recent studies in this area, after a close study of my father’s photo album from the 1936 Berlin Summer Olympics.

 

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My father’s photo album from 1936 Berlin Olympics drives my interest in reading Richard J. Evans’ trilogy about Nazi Germany

I have long been pondering how to approach the writing of a post about my late father’s 1936 Berlin Olympics photo album.

Group portrait of athletes, from the University of Tartu in Estonia, who attended the 1936 Berlin Olympics as student observers. The photo was taken, I believe, at the University of Tartu in 1936. Source: Kaljo Pill

Group portrait of athletes, from the University of Tartu in Estonia, who attended the 1936 Berlin Olympics as student observers. The photo was taken, I believe, in 1936 or earlier. Source: Kaljo Pill

The photo on the right was taken in Tartu, Estonia in 1936 or earlier. The photo, which is available online and is also featured in my father’s 1936 Berlin Olympics photo album, is of group of male university athletes from Estonia, who attended the Berlin Olympics as student observers. Students from all or most of the countries that took part in the 1936 Olympics appear to have sent groups of university-age student observers to the event.

All of the student athletes from Estonia, who attended the Games as observers, were male, so far as I know. However, the album does include photos featuring young women, who may have been Estonian and who may have had some kind of relationship to the University of Tartu athletes who attended the 1936 Berlin Games as student observers.

Also featured prominently, in my father’s photo album, is a photo of Jesse Owens, who won four gold medals at the Berlin Olympics. The album includes a Jesse Owens autograph.

When I get around to it, I will post many more photos from the 1936 album – including Berlin street scenes and photos from the Berlin Olympic Stadium.

Kaljo Pill, at age about 21. Detail from 1936 group photo of athletes from Estonia, who attended the 1936 Berlin Olympics as student observers. Source: Kaljo Pill

Kaljo Pill, age about 21. Detail from 1936 group photo of young athletes from Estonia, who attended the 1936 Berlin Olympics as student observers. Source: Kaljo Pill

I have been reading extensively about the life of Jesse Owens, over the past several months, and have also been reading several books about the 1936 Summer Games.

It is of much interest for me to look closely at photos of my father from a decade prior to my birth. I did not know him then. I do know there is much information available about the history related to the times in which he grew up, and the times that prompted him and many other Estonians to leave Estonia in September 1944 as refugees.

Over the past few months, I have also been reading as much as I can about the history of the Second World War. I have read much about this topic previously, but since having a close look at my father’s 1936 photo album, I have made a point of doing a great deal more reading. In that way I can, to the best of my ability, picture those times more clearly, in my mind.

Richard J. Evans

I’ve recently been reading many books, including:

The Third Reich at War (2008) by Richard J. Evans’ and two books on strength training,

Bigger, Faster, Stronger: The Proven System for Developing Athletes (2017) by Ken Shepard and Kim Gross; and

Eat. Lift. Thrive (2017) by Sohee Lee

Jesse Owens. Source: Kaljo Pill

Jesse Owens. Source: Kaljo Pill

I’ve been reading all three of Richard J. Evans’ trilogy of books about Nazi Germany, as well as several other books addressing the same general themes. The three books in Evan’s trilogy deal with the coming to power of the Third Reich; the Nazi regime in power in the years up to 1939; and the regime at war from 1939 to 1945.

The books about strength training are of interest to me because, like my father, I have a keen interest in fitness. As a regular attendee at the Humber Fitness Centre on Lake Shore Blvd. West, I am currently working on learning to do the Squat and the Dead Lift, as I want to gain proficiency at such compound exercises. The above-noted books are helpful, in enabling me to figure out some of the details for correct performance of these two great strength-training exercises.

High Intensity Interval Training

As part of my fitness pursuits, I also engage in High Intensity Interval Training, which includes running on a treadmill at two-minute sprints going at close to my maximum running speed.

Whenever I do the HIIT training, three times a week, the level of exertion brings to mind an image, of what it would have been like for my father to be running, at his maximum capacity, in middle-distance running events as a university athlete in Estonia.

I also think, as I am running, as hard as I can, of the tremendous achievements of Jessie Owens, as a champion athlete. His going wasn’t easy, once he returned to the USA after the 1936 Olympics. Yet his achievements continue to inspire many of us, even these many years later. My own father’s achievements, as a student athlete in Estonia also inspires me, as one of the few people, who are still alive who would remember who he was, and what his life was about.

 

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Photo from Ulrich Laska (MCHS 1963) of Walter Rhead, Kathleen Dawson and Ulrich Laska reconnecting in Mexico

Left to right: Walter Rhead, Kathleen Dawson and Ulrich Laska reconnecting at Villa Estrella in Mexico. Ulrich Laska photo

Left to right: Walter Rhead, Kathleen Dawson and Ulrich Laska reconnecting at Villa Estrella in Mexico. Ulrich Laska photo

Ulrich Laska (MCHS 1963) – Nov. 17, 2017:

Walter Rhead, Kathleen Dawson and Ulrich Laska reconnecting at Villa Estrella in Mexico.

A lovely heartfelt reunion of dear old friends, in a magical place, catching up on whole lifetimes. Many hugs and occasional moist eyes.

I had not seen Kathy in 53 years. I am hoping we can make this an annual event.

Jaan Pill (MCHS 1963) – Nov. 17, 2017

[Following text is an excerpt from a longer email]

This is awesome Ulrich.

It would be great to post the photo and a small background note. Would it be okay if I proceed?

On another topic – namely great teachers – recently I’ve had a post about a math teacher who was there after we graduated; that post has received a lot of interest:

Ken Kingsbury is doing research on Alfred Ramcharan, who was a teacher at Malcolm Campbell High School

Ulrich Laska – Nov. 17, 2017

Greetings to you, and thank you deeply for your wonderful work in weaving together these threads of time.

Yes please post the photo and email content. We took the photo just this morning for that very purpose.

You will note Walter is holding an MCHS annual from the graduating year 1963. Sadly mine got lost in a basement flood a few years back.

Regarding Ken Kingsbury, I did not know him, we of course fondly remember Bob Saul as math teacher

Ulrich Laska – Oct. 14, 2017

[Following text is an excerpt from a longer email]

We are planning a possible get together with Walter Rhead, and Kathy Dawson, next month in Mexico, so I am hoping that works out.

We continue to be blessed with good health, I am still practicing architecture, and my greatest joy is my ever expanding family of 3 children and 5 grandkids.

 

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Long Branch Neighbourhood Character Guidelines – Text of Final Report, Oct. 26, 2017

A previous post is entitled:

Long Branch Character Guidelines final staff report passed unanimously by Etobicoke-York Community Council

The staff report in question, which was passed unanimously (by recorded vote) at the Nov. 14, 2017 meeting of the Etobicoke-York Community Council, can be accessed here:

Long Branch Neighbourhood Character Guidelines – Final Report – Oct. 26, 2017

I have posted the full text of the report, below:

 

City of Toronto

STAFF REPORT
ACTION REQUIRED

*

Long Branch Neighbourhood Character Guidelines – Final Report

Date: October 26, 2017
To: Etobicoke York Community Council
From: Director, Community Planning, Etobicoke York District
Ward 6 – Etobicoke-Lakeshore

Reference Number: 16 142715 WET 06 TM

SUMMARY

This report presents and seeks City Council adoption of the recommended Long Branch Neighbourhood Character Guidelines. This neighbourhood is experiencing significant development and there is a concern by many that the character of the neighbourhood is being eroded. As a result, it would be important for this neighbourhood to be able to define its character and identify what elements are important to maintain and preserve that character.

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The recommended Long Branch Neighbourhood Character Guidelines result from a City-initiated study, which commenced in early 2016, for all residential lands bounded by Lake Ontario to the south, the rail corridor to the north, Twenty Third Street to the east, and Forty Second Street (including Marie Curtis Park) to the west. This neighbourhood is currently undergoing physical change, resulting from ongoing infill and redevelopment, at a rate which is higher than that of many other neighbourhoods within the City of Toronto.

The Long Branch Character Guidelines is the first of a pilot project of a larger City­ wide Neighbourhood Character Guidelines Template being developed by City Planning. Another pilot area currently being studied is the Willowdale neighbourhood.

The City retained SvN Architects + Planners to assist with the preparation of the “Neighbourhood Character Guidelines Template” and “How to Manual” which would establish a City-wide framework by which neighbourhood-specific guideline documents can be prepared. City staff and the consultants studied two pilot area neighbourhoods (Long Branch and Willowdale) to create and test Guidelines that could be used as an example for other neighbourhoods in the City.

The Long Branch Neighbourhood Character Guidelines aim to ensure that future development within this community is undertaken in a manner which is sensitive and generally consistent with the existing physical character of this neighbourhood. The framework of the Guidelines is based on six themes:

(1) height and massing;

(2) building elements;

(3) driveways and garages;

(4) setbacks and landscape;

(5) special features; and

(6) heritage.

The Long Branch Neighbourhood Character Guidelines will serve as a toolkit for use by home builders, the community, City staff, committees and appeal bodies to reference as they develop plans, enhance the public realm and/or review applications for redevelopment. The “How to Manual” has been incorporated in the Guidelines (under Chapter 3, Section 3.1) in order to provide a framework for how to use these Guidelines (see Attachment 1: Long Branch Neighbourhood Character Guidelines).

This report recommends that Council adopt the Long Branch Neighbourhood Character Guidelines. Should Council adopt these Guidelines, it is also encouraged that the Guidelines be subject to review and evaluation from time to time as the Official Plan is reviewed, to ensure they remain applicable as the Long Branch neighbourhood continues to evolve, and as the Official Plan and Zoning By-law are amended.

RECOMMENDATIONS

The City Planning Division recommends that:

1. City Council adopt the Long Branch Neighbourhood Character Guidelines, included as Attachment 1 to this report.

2. City Council direct staff to apply the Long Branch Neighbourhood Character Guidelines in the review of all new development applications and public initiatives for all residential lands bounded by Lake Ontario to the south, the rail corridor to the north, Twenty Third Street to the east, and Forty Second Street (including Marie Curtis Park) to the west.

3. City Council authorize the Acting Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning to make such stylistic and technical changes to the Long Branch Neighbourhood Character Guidelines as may be required.

Financial Impact
The recommendations in this report have no financial impact.

DECISION HISTORY

This City-initiated study, commenced in early 2016, provided the opportunity for City staff, the Ward Councillor, the consultants and the residents of Long Branch to partake in fulsome discussions to identify issues and opportunities in Long Branch, complete a comprehensive analysis of the character of the area and establish principles and test ideas in order to prepare the Long Branch Neighbourhood Character Guidelines.

Study Background

The objective of the study was to identify the neighbourhood’s key character defining qualities, and to ensure that future developments (new or additions/alterations) in Long Branch are undertaken in a manner which is contextually-sensitive and responsive to the prevailing neighbourhood character. To achieve this, the Guidelines incorporate
a design methodology which evaluates future development at three concentric scales, including:

1. The property in relation to adjacent properties;

2. The property in relation to the street and block segment; and

3. The property in relation to the broader neighbourhood context.

A neighbourhood’s character is composed of a number of individual elements that together contribute to the creation of a distinct ‘sense of place’. The City of Toronto Official Plan, as amended, incorporates a set of policies which support the protection and enhancement of existing lands within a Neighbourhoods designation. The Official Plan criteria to evaluate development in Neighbourhoods is set out in Policy 4.1.5, which states:

Development in established Neighbourhoods will respect and reinforce the existing physical character of the neighbourhood, including in particular:

  •  Patterns of streets, blocks and lanes, parks and public building sites;
  •  Size and configuration of lots;
     Heights, massing and scale and dwelling type of nearby residential properties;
  •  Prevailing building type(s);
  •  Prevailing design and elevation of driveways and garages;
  •  Setbacks of buildings from the street or streets;
  •  Prevailing patterns of rear and side yard setbacks and landscaped open space;
  •  Continuation of special landscape or built-form features that contribute to the unique physical character of a geographic neighbourhood; and
  •  Conservation of heritage buildings, structures and landscapes.

The Official Plan also goes on to state that no changes will be made through rezoning, minor variance, consent or other public action that are out of keeping with the physical character of the neighbourhood.

Overall, Neighbourhoods are considered to be physically stable areas and development is to respect and reinforce the existing physical character of buildings, streetscapes and open space patterns. The recommended Long Branch Neighbourhood Character Guidelines intend to provide home builders, the community, City staff, committees
and appeal bodies a means to better understand the Long Branch community as it relates to these Official Plan polices.

It should also be noted that the character of a neighbouhood is influenced by, but not limited to, architectural style. It is important to understand that Guidelines are ultimately concerned with compatibility rather than similarity of elements or “mimicking”, and therefore focus on character over style.

The preparation of the Long Branch Neighbourhood Character Guidelines has followed a three step process: (1) the analysis of issues and opportunities; (2) the development of a vision and design priorities; and (3) the refinement and preparation of the Guidelines.

Public Engagement

On May 17, 2016, City Planning staff, together with the Ward Councillor and the consultants (SvN Architects + Planners), held a public meeting to outline the above process and present the purpose and scope of the Neighbourhood Character Guidelines and the various design elements that help shape Guidelines. The meeting was attended by approximately 100 members of the public. In order to help identify issues and opportunities, participants were asked to provide feedback on three concepts:

1. Design elements they felt are/are not compatible with the character they envision for Long Branch.

2. The strengths and weaknesses of Long Branch including favourite areas, areas that could be improved, areas that are most representative of neighbourhood character, and areas of concern.

3. A description of neighbourhood character.

On June 28, 2016, the consultants conducted a walking tour of the Long Branch neighbourhood with a community advisory group (approximately 60 members) consisting of residents and other stakeholders. Also in attendance was City Planning staff and the Ward Councillor. The purpose of the walking tour was to further explore issues and opportunities that were raised at the public meeting and to develop a vision and identify design priorities for Long Branch. Participants were requested to provide feedback on those design elements they felt were priorities and ideas for how these design priorities could be implemented through the Guidelines.

On February 7, 2017, City Planning staff, together with the Ward Councillor and the consultants, held a second community advisory group meeting attended by approximately 40 members. The participants were presented with reference materials that included a draft Character Framework Plan and draft Neighbourhood Character Guidelines for Long Branch.

The Character Framework Plan (titled Character Summary in the Guidelines) highlighted the character defining conditions of the area which include, but are not limited to:

  • Historic Long Branch housing stock dating back to original “villa” lots; corner lots of distinctive character.
  • Hipped or gabled roofs, front porches, brick or wood siding, ground-related first floor, and prominent and grade-related entrance and window placements to establish a strong street interface.
  • Consistent and generous front yard setbacks with exceptions where dictated through variations in the street and block network (i.e. Arcadian Circle), maintaining continuous street wall conditions, landscaping, mature trees, and accent planting while allowing for projections and recesses to articulate the primary façade, and minimizing curb cuts to maintain the continuity of the pedestrian realm.

Framework of the Guidelines

The draft Neighbourhood Character Guidelines identified six themes:

(1) height and massing;

(2) building elements;

(3) driveways and garages;

(4) setbacks and landscape;

(5) special features and

(6) heritage.

The recommended Neighbourhood Character Guidelines were provided in the following framework for each theme:

A. Overview of the primary conditions in Long Branch and the key design guidelines related to the particular theme;

B. Reference of the key design objectives and supporting diagram for each theme;

C. Summary of the zoning regulations pertinent to each theme;

D. Explanation of the intent and implication of these regulations in the context of the Long Branch neighbourhood;

E. List of key design guidelines to achieve the intent and purpose of the zoning and mitigate potential conflicts with the character of the neighbourhood;

F. Sidebar of relevant ‘Character Defining Conditions’;

G. Annotated photograph of existing conditions which are considered incompatible related to the particular theme; and

H. Annotated photograph of an existing compatible condition related to the particular theme.

The participants were requested to provide feedback on potential refinements to strengthen the draft Guidelines and ensure they were consistent with the character defining conditions that were previously identified through the public meeting and walking tour.

On September 26, 2017, City Planning staff, together with the Ward Councillor and the consultants, held a final public meeting to seek further refinements before finalizing the Neighbourhood Character Guidelines for Long Branch. This meeting was attended by approximately 80 members of the public. This provided staff with another opportunity to engage those residents that did not take part in the walking tour and the community advisory group meeting.

Long Branch Neighbourhood Character Guidelines

The Long Branch Neighbourhood Character Guidelines are expected to be used to advance the City’s Official Plan Policies (under the Neighbourhoods designation) and the regulations of the zoning by-laws (the former City of Etobicoke Zoning Code and City- wide Zoning By-law No. 569-2013) to help translate these directions into desired outcomes for the design of buildings, streets and open spaces. The recommended Long Branch Neighbourhood Character Guidelines (see Attachment 1: Long Branch Neighbourhood Character Guidelines) are intended to serve as a toolkit for use by home builders, the community, City staff, committees and appeal bodies to reference as
they develop plans, enhance the public realm and/or review applications for redevelopment for all residential lands within the study area.

The intent of the Guidelines is to complement the Official Plan policies and by-laws with a series of design recommendations aimed at reinforcing the established character of the neighbourhood and mitigating potential conflicts. In order to achieve a balance between the policies and zoning regulations, priority themes have been identified. The recommended themes and design guidelines include:

Height and Massing

The recommended Neighbourhood Character Guidelines rely on the perception of the general shape, form and size of the building. While building dimensions such as height or width can be purely quantitative, mass and scale are typically qualitative dimensions that result from combining many spatial parameters in context, include but not limited to:

  • Proportion between building dimensions;
  • Comparison to the dimensions of adjacent buildings;
  • Alignment with other buildings; and
  • Height and location relative to the public streets.

Building Elements

The recommended Neighbourhood Character Guidelines rely on the design details that together compose the street-related face of a building. The articulation of these design details include and collectively influence the perception of a building’s mass and scale by the:

  •  Slope and orientation of roofs;
  •  Level and depth of the front entrance;
  •  Size and quantity of windows;
  •  Placement and prominence of ornamental façade elements; and
  •  Type and combination of materials.

Driveways and Garages

The recommended Neighbourhood Character Guidelines rely on the citing and access to the garage, as well as surface parking within each property. While parking may have little impact to the site layout on large lots, lot frontage is usually tight for residential lots within an urban condition and thus parking competes for space with other elements, including but not limited to: front entrance; doors and windows; pedestrian walkway; trees; and gardens.

Setbacks and Landscape

The recommended Neighbourhood Character Guidelines rely on the dimensions that determine the placement of a building on a property and in turn, the amount and use of open space around a building. Setbacks and landscape play a critical role by:

  •  Defining the interface between the private and public realm;
  •  Increasing or decreasing the perception of density; and
  •  Providing visual connections to soft landscaping within a neighbourhood.

Special Features

The recommended Neighbourhood Character Guidelines rely on those elements that play a critical role in contributing to the public realm of a neighbourhood. The existing mature tree canopy and open space system (neighbourhood parks, the Etobicoke Creek and Lake Ontario shoreline) are vital assets in Long Branch’s public realm and contribute significantly to its overall character.
Heritage

The recommended Neighbourhood Character Guidelines stress the importance of historically significance attributes to a neighbourhood and the importance of identification and following the appropriate steps to protect a community’s heritage.

NEXT STEPS

Moving forward, the consultant (SvN Architects + Planners) is currently preparing Neighbourhood Character Guidelines for the Willowdale pilot area as well as finalizing the City-wide “Neighbourhood Character Guidelines Template”, both targeted to be completed in 2018.

The Template will provide the rationale, planning process context and high-level overview of the “how to” of preparing Neighbourhood Character Guidelines. In addition, introductory information on each of the guideline sections and accompanying worksheets (that communities can use to develop guidelines of their own) will also be included as part of this Template.

Overall, the studied pilot area neighbourhoods (Long Branch and Willowdale) will be used as a guide for other neighbourhoods in the City to use to complete their own “Neighbourhood Character Guidelines Template”.
Staff Report for Action – Final Report – Long Branch Neighbourhood Character Guidelines 7

CONCLUSION

The recommended Long Branch Neighbourhood Character Guidelines aim to ensure that development respects and reinforces the existing physical character within the Long Branch neighbourhood. They will serve as a toolkit for use by home builders, the community, City staff, committees and appeal bodies to reference as they develop plans, enhance the public realm and/or review applications for redevelopment to achieve compatibility and a variety of architectural styles between existing and new/altered buildings.

CONTACTS

Sabrina Salatino, Planner
Community Planning
City Planning Division
Tel. No. 416-394-8025
Fax No. 416-394-6063
E-mail: Sabrina.Salatino@toronto.ca

James Parakh, Program Manager Urban Design
City Planning Division
Tel. No. 416-392-1139
Fax No. 416-392-1744
E-mail: James.Parakh@toronto.ca

Jack Krubnik, Senior Planner Urban Design
City Planning Division
Tel. No. 416-394-6064
Fax No. 416-394-6063
Email: Jack.Krubnik@toronto.ca

SIGNATURE
______________________________ Neil Cresswell, MCIP, RPP
Director of Community Planning Etobicoke York District


ATTACHMENT

Attachment 1: Long Branch Neighbourhood Character Guidelines

Attachment 1: Long Branch Neighbourhood Character Guidelines

[Please note: I do not know for sure which version of the guidelines is in the appendix. Unless there is a more recent version, that I do not have information about, the version may be the August 2017 version, which you can access here.]

 

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Humber Bay Park Project – Building Concept

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The image is related to the Humber Bay Park Project, concerning which a link is accessible, at the post you are now reading. Click on the image to enlarge it.

I’ve recently received a notice about a CCFEW Bird Walk. The notice includes a reference to the Humber Bay Park project. The text in the message refers to an Oct. 30, 2017 meeting about the Humber Bay Park architectural component.

“The presentation materials are online,” the message notes, “but a bit difficult to find on the project page.”

The message provides a link to the presentation materials, which I am pleased to include in the sentence you are now reading.

As well, you can read CCFEW’s comments here >

Commentary

CCFEW is doing great work – but is restricted, in its efforts to reach the wider public, by an unwieldy name and acronym.

From a media relations perspective, the group would do vastly better with a shorter, more engaging name.

I speak as a person who’s been involved in observing, and occasionally taking part in, a wide range of media relations initiatives, involving the re-naming of non-profit organizations, over the past several decades.

That said, I am pleased to provide the above-noted links, as I support the work that CCFEW (as it’s called) is doing.

 

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Long Branch Character Guidelines final staff report passed unanimously by Etobicoke-York Community Council

Ward 6 Councillor Mark Grimes (in centre) played a key role in the launch and development of the Long Branch Character Guidelines Pilot project. Jaan Pill photo

Ward 6 Councillor Mark Grimes (second from the left) played a key role in the launch and development of the Long Branch Character Guidelines Pilot project. Jaan Pill photo

I wasn’t planning to attend the Nov. 14, 2017 meeting of the Etobicoke-York Community Council, where the Long Branch Character Guidelines final staff report was up for a vote.

I’m pleased I attended.

At the last minute, after reading an email, I decided to get a ride to the meeting.

I took along a library book and spent time reading it and making notes from it while other topics, prior to the Character Guidelines item, were up for discussion. I also had my audio recorder running.

The report, which was passed unanimously, can be accessed here:

Long Branch Neighbourhood Character Guidelines – Final Report – Oct. 26, 2017

Brian Liberty spoke at the meeting in his role as co-chair of the Long Branch Neighbourhood Association, featured in a Nov. 14, 2017 article by Cynthia Reason in the Etobicoke Guardian. Christine Mercado, the other LBNA co-chair, also attended.

A number of people, who spoke at this meeting, had not been planning to speak. At the last minute, they came to the microphone and said their piece. They spoke from the heart.

I was impressed with the quality of the dialogue and the sense of respect and decorum that was evident.

Please refer to the above-noted link for a copy of the report.

Click here for previous posts about the Long Branch Character Guidelines Pilot Project >

In the next several days, I will post a detailed overview of the discussion at this meeting.

 

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City of Mississauga: A New Master Plan for Culture – Nov. 30, 2017, 6:00 pm Open House & Presentation

The following message is from Mississauga Culture.

Click here to access the message in your browser >

A New Master Plan for Culture

A Culture Master Plan will provide direction for investment in arts, culture and heritage. The plan will recognize strengths and identify gaps and opportunities to enhance Mississauga’s quality of life and quality of place.

From January to March we gathered your feedback via public meetings, twitter chats and an online survey. We have been busy incorporating your feedback into the new Culture Master Plan and we are ready to share the draft plan with you.

On November 30 the City of Mississauga is having a public meeting to share the draft recommendations.

When:

November 30, 2017
6:00 pm – Open House
6:45 pm – Presentation and question period

Where:

Mississauga Valleys Community Centre, LC Taylor Auditorium, 1275 Mississauga Valley Blvd, Mississauga, ON
[MAP]

If you are not able to attend the meeting, the material will be posted on our website by November 23. You can review them and provide feedback or comments online by December 4.

Mississauga Valleys CC is an accessible space with universal and family bathrooms available on the first floor.

Take MiWay! Mississauga Valleys CC is right on the Cawthra #8 route.

If you have any questions please email culture.masterplan@mississauga.ca

City of Mississauga Culture Division
201 City Centre Drive, Suite 202
Mississauga, Ontario L5B 2T4
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If you’re having trouble viewing this message, open it in a browser window
If you don’t want to receive emails from us anymore, click here to unsubscribe.

 

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Iris Evelina Giggs (1929-2017) excelled as a ballet teacher in Toronto and Mississauga

I met Jonathan Giggs, son of Iris Evelina Giggs, at a recent Ward 6 Local History event, outlined at a previous post:

Highly valuable local history project has been initiated by Ward 6 Councillor Mark Grimes

Jonathan mentioned that his mother, who had a ballet school during the time the family lived at Humber Bay Shores in Etobicoke, had passed away in October 2017.

Iris Evelina Giggs (1929-2017)

From reading Jonathan Gigg’s Twitter messages, I’ve come across the following Toronto Star obituary for Iris Evelina Giggs:

GIGGS, Iris Evelina, A.R.A.D. April 25, 1929 – October 16, 2017 Iris Giggs died peacefully and without pain after a short illness at Etobicoke General William Osler Health System, surrounded by her four children Julian, Jonathan, Simon and Hilary. Predeceased by her husband Leslie Thomas (February 26, 1925 – July 29, 1994), she was born in Brixton, England and immigrated to Canada in 1957, settling in Humber Bay Etobicoke and eventually Lakeview/Port Credit, Mississauga.

A ballet teacher, mentor and friend to countless children, she taught for decades in Toronto at Mooredale House, Ursuline School, Havergal College, Branksome Hall and her own studios Academy of Ballet (Mount Pleasant/Eglinton) and at Rosedale Presbyterian Church. Best known in Mississauga for her studio in Port Credit (1959 to 2010).

A proud lifetime member of the Royal Academy of Dance. First recipient of the Mississauga Arts Council Award for Dance in 1994.

Thanks to the staff that cared for her in the last years of life at Woodbridge Vista. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the Alzheimer Society of Toronto. Visitation on Friday, November 3, 2017 between 4 and 7 p.m. at Skinner and Middlebrook Funeral Home, 128 Lakeshore Road East, Mississauga. A Celebration of Life to be held at later date, time and location to be confirmed. More information: jonathangiggs@bell.net

[End]

Past Jane’s Walks in Lakeview and Port Credit

Jonathan is also active with local history events in Port Credit. I first met him, as I recall, when he took part in a Jane’s Walk led by Jim Tovey in Lakeview a few years ago. That would have been at a walk in 2015 or 2016:

Thanks from Jim Tovey for volunteers who made May 28, 2016 Small Arms Jane’s Walk a terrific event

Ward 1 Councillor Jim Tovey leads Jane’s Walk in Lakeview (Mississauga) at 12:00 noon on Sunday, May 3, 2015

I also met Jonathan at a great Jane’s Walk that I attended in Port Credit some time back:

Jane’s Walk, Sunday, May 28, 2017, 10:00 am – Port Credit and Jane Jacobs: past, present and future development

The current post will serve as a reminder, for me, to get around to posting material from the latter walk, in Port Credit, which I found of much interest!

 

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