Preserved Stories Blog

Etobicoke Creek thousands of years ago gave rise to what is now an underwater valley

At a presentation I attended in Mississauga of an underwater valley — now located south of teh current shoreline of Lake Ontario — associated with an earlier stage in the history of Etobicoke Creek.

We know from geological evidence that, during its Glacial Lake Iroquois stage, the water level of Lake Ontario was higher than it is now.

There’s a road in Oakville, north of the Queen Elizabeth Way at Trafalgar Road, that is conveniently named Iroquois Shore Road. The road indicates where the Glacial Lake Iroquois shoreline used to be located. Evidence of the shoreline is visible across Mississauga and Toronto as well.

For example, the old shoreline is indicated by a hill that one encounters when travelling north along Avenue Road or Yonge Street when approaching St. Clair Avenue West. Similarly a hill, with a less abrupt slope is encountered, as I recall, in Mississauga when travelling north along Hurontario Street north of Dundas Street West.

An excellent account of the rise and fall of this lake is provided by John Chapman and Donald Putnam in their classic and authoritative text, Physiography of Southern Ontario, 3rd Edition (1984).

Thereafter, the water level went much lower than it is now, during what is called the Lake Admiralty phase of Lake Ontario.

During the time Lake Ontario was at a lower level, Etobicoke Creek formed a valley which is now underwater.

I look forward to learning details about this valley

In an earlier version of this blog, I wrote:

“The map below, which I’ve created to show the configuration of Etobicoke Creek in the years before and after it was channelized, provides useful information concerning the direction in which the creek would likely have flowed during the thousands of years when the water level of the lake was lower than its current level.”

The text above is based on an incorrect assumption on my part.

That is, it’s not likely that the creek has flowed in a westerly direction for thousands of years. In fact, as I understand, the flow might have been in all manner of directions over such a period of time.

We owe thanks to Robert Lansdale for sharing the fact — based on his knowledge as an engineer with direct experience with the physical features of Lake Ontario — that one cannot make the assumption that I have made in the above-noted earlier version of my text.

Robert Lansdale notes that Etobicoke Creek and the surrounding lands have changed drastically over thousands — and even hundreds — of years.

“The spit where Lake Promenade and the cottages were located,” he comments, “was mostly created via sand being dumped in this area from the Lake Ontario beach currents, such as from the Sunnyside areas and easterly. That’s what most likely caused the creek to have become diverted. ”

 

Configuration of Etobicoke Creek prior to its channelization

 

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Posted in Jane's Walk, Long Branch | Leave a comment

Montreal is 375 years old, but how old are its buildings? Great interactive map at CBC website

Montreal is 375 years old, but how old are its buildings?

The opening paragraphs read:

By Roberto Rocha

Montreal is celebrating its 375th anniversary, but very few vestiges of its early history remain. The number of standing structures from the time of Paul Chomedey de Maisonneuve and Jeanne Mance can be counted on two hands.

But 375 years is a long time, enough for dozens of styles and ways of thinking to rise and fall. And fortunately, we have preserved a little bit of each along the way.

This map is an imperfect way to show that. It shows every building on the island coloured by its approximate year of construction. It’s imperfect because it was cobbled together from various data sources, many of them incomplete (read the FAQ to know more).

[End]

 

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Town of Port Credit Association shares comments about Port Credit Marina Lands Official Plan Amendment. Note also May 23, 2017 public meeting.

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3-D Model provided by the City of Mississauga. Photo courtesy of Irene Owchar. Click on the image to enlarge it.

I have been following with interest the story of the Port Credit redevelopment process.

However, I have not been following the details of the story closely.

By way of publicizing, in a small way, some of the ongoing discussions, I am pleased to have the opportunity to share a message from the Town of Port Credit Association (TOPCA) regarding the #PortCredit Marina Lands Official Plan Amendment (OPA) for One Port Street:

Commentary regarding Port Credit Marina Lands Official Plan Amendment – May 5, 2017

Recent posts about Port Credit include:

Port Credit massive (and yet, human-scale) redevelopment project; more details at 7:00 pm, May 23, 2017 meeting at historic Clarke Memorial Hall

Port Credit Cultural Walking Tours – last Saturday of every month, April to October

Previous posts about Port Credit and Mississauga

Click here for previous posts about Port Credit >

Click here for previous posts about Mississauga >

 

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Overview about South Mimico Creek Trail and other trail projects – TRCA presentation at LAMP, May 30, 2017, 7:00 pm

Creek_Trails_Poster

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Planned construction on Runway 05/23 at Toronto Pearson has been completed – fall closure period no longer required

For full text of a May 16, 2017 update from Toronto Pearson International Airport/GTAA,

please click here >

 

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Court battles, forgery allegations – CBC Toronto investigation reveals 3 men seeking control of condo boards in the city

A May 15, 2017 CBC article is entitled: “Condo clash: Court battles, forgery allegations and questions over who controls Toronto highrises: CBC Toronto investigation reveals 3 men seeking control of condo boards in the city.”

The opening paragraphs, by CBC reporters By John Lancaster, Michael Smee, read:

“Owners and property managers at several downtown condominium buildings are accusing a group of individuals of hijacking their boards of directors to get control of multi-million dollar budgets and reserve funds.

“CBC Toronto has linked a group, made up of three men and some associates, to condo boards in about a dozen highrises in Toronto and Mississauga over the last several years.

“In many of these cases, the individuals controlling the boards don’t appear to own units in the building.”

[End of excerpt]

 

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Four upcoming public meetings: 1 Blue Goose & GEMS of Etobicoke-Lakeshore; Pearson Airport; & 25 Audely St and 23 Buckingham St

The following information (aside from the GEMS item) is from the Lakeshore Planning Council. I am not a member of this group; however, I see value in the information this group, and a range of other sources, share with regard to upcoming public meetings and events.

(Except for selective highlighting of a word here or there, I don’t like working with all-caps headings but I do not want to spend time in changing the capitalization, in the case of the three headings below. As a volunteer, I like to provide a public service, from time to time, by way of posting information at this website, but do not want to wear myself out.)

(1) WEDNESDAY, MAY 17, 2017 – REDEVELOPMENT OF 1 BLUE GOOSE STREET

Date: Wednesday, May 17, 2017
Time: 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

Public Mtg – May 17, 2017 – 1 Blue Goose

Place: St. Leo Catholic School, 165 Stanley Avenue

(2) SATURDAY, MAY 27, 2017 – PEARSON AIRPORT AND OUR COMMUNITIES

Date: Saturday, May 27, 2017
Time: 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Toronto Pearson – Sat May 27, 2017

Place: Silverthorn Collegiate Institute, 291 Mill Rd., Etobicoke

(3) WEDNESDAY, JUNE 7, 2017 – REDEVELOPMENT OF 25 AUDLEY ST AND 23 BUCKINGHAM ST

Date: Wednesday, June 7, 2017
Time: 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
Place: St. Leo Catholic School, 165 Stanley Avenue

Notice Public Mtg Jun 7, 2017

[End of message]

Please note other’s also another great meeting on Wednesday, May 17, 2017

REMINDER: You are invited to GEMS of Etobicoke-Lakeshore Awards Ceremony, Wednesday, May 17, 2017 at 7 pm, The Assembly Hall, 1 Colonel Sam Smith Park Drive

 

PeterMilczyn_quarterV_MAY17-01

 

 

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Volunteer Opportunity – CSA national coordinator – Canadian Stuttering Association

I am pleased to share the following message from Andrew Harding of the Canadian Stuttering Association.

Opportunity – CSA national coordinator

If you take pride in leading an organisation to improve the lives of people who stutter and their families, we have an unrivalled opportunity for you as national coordinator. Your vision and leadership will enable the Canadian Stuttering Association to achieve our mission to help people who stutter fulfil their potential – both personal and professional.

We are based largely around the Toronto area and welcome applicants from across Canada who would be able to travel to Toronto for key meetings.

The CSA is a volunteer led and managed charity, made possible by our passion and commitment to making life better for people who stutter across Canada. To lead a dedicated and highly skilled team, we need your help for four to six hours a week.

The national coordinator provides leadership on Association projects and activities. The coordinator is responsible for the overall proper functioning of the Association and ensuring its decisions and policies serve the purpose and mission of the Association.

To succeed, you will need to understand the needs and culture of the Association, the needs of volunteers, and how to motivate the volunteer team to achieve our goals.

Familiarity with Canadian charity law, volunteer management and financial management will be highly valuable. It’s a good time to take on this role as the Association builds its volunteer base and profile, based largely around the annual conferences.

Process

As national coordinator and chair of the Board you will work closely with other Board members and the conference committee.

Tasks

• Help define tasks and roles, and find people to do them
• Oversee the core roles in finance, administration, communication and event management
• Set meeting agendas and ensure meeting are publicised
• Ensure action points are recorded and acted on – providing follow-up as needed
• Help with information enquiries on occasion
• Seek out guest speakers and help identify conference presenters
• The first point of contact for phone calls (less than one per week and this can be reassigned)
• Provide guidance on the newsletter
• Develop a network of contacts among speech and language pathologists and researchers
• Help to define and establish consistent CSA messages and tone
• Represent CSA to peer and professional bodies where appropriate
• Chair Board meetings; set and maintain a positive tone for discussions and decisions

The rewards are a real sense of achievement in getting things done, bringing people together, and seeing people’s lives improve.

To apply, please tell us why you would like to join the team, what skills you can bring to the role, along with your resume. We can then arrange a phone call or email chat.

Further information

Andrew Harding, national coordinator

andrewharding@stutter.ca

 

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Team of quick-thinking residents saves the life of muskrat-like creature stuck on Etobicoke Creek Bridge at Marie Curtis Park

This is the creature, whatever species it may be, that is the star of the post that you are now reading. Jaan Pill photo

This is the creature, whatever species it may be, that is the star of the post that you are now reading. Jaan Pill photo. Click on the image to enlarge it’ click again to enlarge it further.

On many days, I walk from the vicinity of the Long Branch TTC Loop in Etobicoke (Toronto) to the Small Arms Building in Lakeview (Mississauga) at Dixie Road and Lakeshore Road East.

It’s a walk that I enjoy; over the years I’ve been documenting, at this website, the changes and events that have been taking place at the Small Arms Building, and at the Arsenal Grounds near the building. Most recently, the news is that the City of Mississauga has taken ownership of the building from Toronto and Region Conservation. This changeover of ownership is part of the process whereby the Small Arms Building will be preserved and repurposed to function as a vital Community & Cultural Hub.

The work that is being done, at this building and elsewhere in Mississauga, with regard to preservation and repurposing of historical buildings and places, is a source of tremendous inspiration for many people – me among them, even thought I do not live in Mississauga!

The creature initially arrived at a location near the west side of the bridge. Jaan Pill photo

The creature initially arrived at a location near the west side of the bridge. Jaan Pill photo

On Saturday, May 13, 2017 at around 12:45 pm, as I was walking back toward Long Branch from the Small Arms Building, I came across a remarkable sight at the bridge that crosses Etobicoke Creek just west of Forty Third Street. I saw a creature hopping across the road from the south side of the bridge to the other side. It appeared to me at once that this was a creature that was not used to hopping its way across a paved surface. It did not appear to me that this was a creature built for speed.

I was pleased that no cars were travelling across the bridge, at that point. The animal, which looked a bit like a beaver, but wasn’t, and looked a bit like a squirrel, but was bigger, made it to the sidewalk on the north side of the bridge.

It arrived at a point at the western edge of the bridge. However, instead of proceeding further to the west, and from there to the safety of the grassy area north of the sidewalk, it decided to start hopping east toward the Long Branch side of the bridge. It hopped in that direction for some time, but then stopped.

As a next step, in dealing with the situation that it found itself in, the creature proceeded to hop toward the west side of the bridge, but then stopped and decided not to move further. Jaan Pill photo

As a next step, in dealing with the situation that it found itself in, the creature proceeded to hop toward the west side of the bridge, but then stopped and decided not to move further. Jaan Pill photo

Why it stopped, I don’t know. When we see an animal, we may be inclined to make all manner of assumptions about its state of mind, and its emotional state. However, ever since taking a First Year Sociology course at McGill University in Montreal, taught by a Professor named Laing in the mid-1960s, I’ve been aware that, whenever we note the behaviour of some animal, and make inferences based on our observations, we need to give some thought to the question of whether our inferences are corroborated by any evidence. Given that we are not in a position to have a chat with an animal, the extent of the available corroboration may be quite limited.

So, I will stick to the observable behaviours. I noted that the animal had arrived at a particular point, and at that point it was not prepared to advance further. At one point, when I approached it head-on and took a photograph, it backed up quickly. But than it stopped. When I walked up to it from the west, stepping within a short distance of it, it did not move. Instead, it turned its neck and looked toward me.

For some time, the creature stayed immobile. Jaan Pill photo

For some time, the creature stayed immobile. Jaan Pill photo

My immediate concern was that, if the creature were to try to hop back across the roadway, seeking to return to where it had begun, there was a strong likelihood that it would be struck by a car, as the traffic was quite heavy, at that time.

Jaan Pill photo

Jaan Pill photo

I decided that, in the circumstances, the best option would be for me to continue walking east. I surmised that, in time, the animal would decide to continue hopping toward the east, until it reached a grassy area at the eastern side of the bridge, where it could proceed on its way toward the banks of Etobicoke Creek.

Once I got to Thirty Third Street, and looked back, I saw that a young woman and a young man had taken account of the situation, and were involved in a conversation regarding the topic at hand. Then I noticed that a car had stopped on the westbound lane, closest to the sidewalk, and the driver had activated the car’s emergency lights.

I then saw the animal hop under the car, where it stayed.

On the right you can see the car that stopped to give assistance. Jaan Pill photo. Click on the photo to enlarge it' click again to enlarge it further.

On the right you can see the car that stopped to give assistance. The creature is located, at this point, underneath the car. Jaan Pill photo. Click on the photo to enlarge it; click again to enlarge it further.

Thereupon, someone from the car had some object, which may have been a hand-held windshield cleaner, which was being used to try to prompt the animal to get out from under the car and move back onto the sidewalk. The driver of a car on the inside westbound lane had also stopped. Soon a good number of cars had stopped, blocking both the westbound lanes. From where I was standing, I waved my arms to alert incoming drivers from the west that something was afoot, so that they would be alert to the need to start applying their brakes as they approach the stopped cars up ahead.

If you click on this high-resolution photo, and then click again, you will get a good view of the scene. Jaan Pill photo

If you click on the photo, and then click again, you will get a good view of the scene. “A job well done,” is what I would say. A round of applause was heard, as the creature scurried on its way to safety. Jaan Pill photo

Well, the story ended well! The animal, whatever species it was, jumped out from under the car, and then proceeded to hop along the sidewalk, heading east until it came to the grassy side at the eastern end of the bridge. It was home free! There was applause all around. The cars started up again, and I continued walking east along Lake Shore Road West.

If you as a site visitor can help us, by way of offering a definitive identification of the species of animal that we have encountered, on the occasion that I have described, please contact me.

Here’s a video of Larry (or is it Lucy) Long Branch (or is it Larry or Lucy Lakeview)?

 

 

The above-noted Vimeo link features the following description:

You can find the back story here:

Team of quick-thinking residents saves the life of muskrat-like creature stuck on Etobicoke Creek Bridge at Marie Curtis Park

The video shows the part where the Ground Hog is walking for a short distance on the way toward the east side of the bridge over Etobicoke Creek. When it moved across the roadway, it hopped or ran or did whatever this species of creatures does, when it’s in a hurry.

I look forward to borrowing books and also DVDs (if there are any available) about Ground Hogs (assuming that’s the definitive ID) from the Toronto Public Library, so that I can get better acquainted with Larry or Lucy the Ground Hog’s Life Out in Nature. Definitely, an adorable creature, however fast or slow it moves when travelling across a roadway or sidewalk!

Click here for additional Jaan Pill Vimeo videos  >

 

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Posted in Long Branch, Mississauga, Newsletter, Story management, Toronto | 1 Comment

When placed in a historic landscape, contemporary architecture requires a layered approach: Finland’s UNESCO World Heritage Fortress

Perspective view. Image Courtesy of

Perspective view. Image Courtesy of Heikkinen & Kangasaho

A May 13, 2017 Arch Daily article is entitled: “Contemporary Housing to Reinforce Finland’s UNESCO World Heritage Fortress.”

The opening paragraphs read:

When placed in a historic landscape, contemporary architecture requires a layered approach. It must often strike a respectful, vernacular tone, whilst embracing the innovative, functional hallmarks of a modern building. This balance has particular relevance at Suomenlinna Sea Fortress, located off the coast of Helsinki, Finland. Throughout its 300-year history, it was once occupied by the armies of Sweden, Russia and Finland – a rich history attracting UNESCO World Heritage status, and almost one million annual visitors. The site is more than a museum, however, but a living district of Helsinki with 800 inhabitants and 500 jobs.

Against the prerequisites of past and present, Heikkinen & Kangasaho Architects have combined sharp, functional modernity with respectful, restrained simplicity in a new housing scheme to sit amongst Suomenlinna’s historic fortifications.

[End]

 

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REMINDER: You are invited to GEMS of Etobicoke-Lakeshore Awards Ceremony, Wednesday, May 17, 2017 at 7 pm, The Assembly Hall, 1 Colonel Sam Smith Park Drive

PeterMilczyn_quarterV_MAY17-01

Following message is from Etobicoke-Lakeshore MPP Peter Milczyn’s Office:

Do you know a Gem of Etobicoke-Lakeshore 2017?

The Gems of Etobicoke-Lakeshore were created to recognize and appreciate outstanding small businesses, community and service organizations that are unique to South Etobicoke and make our community a more vibrant place to live, work and play.

What are the criteria for a Gems selection? The small business or community organization must be within the riding of Etobicoke-Lakeshore. We are looking to recognize those that provide outstanding customer service.

Help celebrate and highlight small businesses, service and community organizations in Etobicoke-Lakeshore that make our community sparkle! Please join me on Wednesday, May 17, 2017 at 7:00 pm at the Assembly Hall located at 1 Colonel Sam Smith Drive (Kipling and Lake Shore Blvd West) for the Gems of Etobicoke-Lakeshore recognition ceremony!

Hope to see you there,

Peter Milczyn, MPP
Etobicoke-Lakeshore

 

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