Search Results for: film noir

Is film noir a genre, or is it a critical category?

I recently came across a critical argument, in Film Noir: Hard-Boiled Modernity and the Cultures of Globalization (2010), that questions whether film noir is a genre. It’s not a topic that I’ve given much thought to – until I took … Continue reading

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Churchill’s Ministry of Ungentlemanly Warfare (2017) provides a good overview of “irregular warfare” in the Second World War

I’ve recently finished reading Churchill’s Ministry of Ungentlemanly Warfare: The Mavericks Who Plotted Hitler’s Defeat (2017). I’ve also been reading A Most Ungentlemanly Way of War: The SOE and the Canadian Connection (2015). I first became interested in irregular warfare … Continue reading

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Not a good day, some days ago: Graeme Decarie, who taught history at Concordia University for many years, shares some thoughts about mass murders

I’m just catching up with posting of a message from Graeme Decarie. Graeme Decarie was a history teacher at Malcolm Campbell High School in Montreal. I didn’t have a history class with him but he was an advisor to the … Continue reading

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Narcoland (2013) describes a disastrous “war on drugs” that has led to more than 80,000 deaths in Mexico since its inception in 2006

Over the years, I’ve written several posts about the War on Drugs. One post, by way of example, is entitled: The Drug Wars in America, 1940-1973 (Kathleen J. Frydl, 2013) A key point in the above-noted study is that national drug … Continue reading

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Portrait by Gaby of Malcolm A. Campbell features dramatic low key lighting

An impressive portrait of Malcolm A. Campbell by a Montreal photographer named Gaby is featured in the 1963-64 Malcolm Campbell High School annual. When I looked at the portrait, I thought at once: “Film noir, 1940s black and white movies.” … Continue reading

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The Big Sleep (1946) demonstrates the effective application of screen direction, sound, lighting, and editing

The Big Sleep (1946) demonstrates four characteristic film techniques. The techniques – applied in the opening credits and scenes of The Big Sleep (1946), based on  a novel (1939) by Raymond Chandler – are: (1) screen direction as described in Cinematic Storytelling (2005), … Continue reading

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The Maltese Falcon, based upon the novel by Damiell Hammett, is great entertainment

As a part-time Ryerson film student I’ve recently watched some great movies. In this post I’ll discuss The Maltese Falcon (1941) starring Humphrey Bogart (1899-1957) and Mary Astor (1906-1987). The movie is black and white with fairly hard light sources. The … Continue reading

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Revue Cinema free screening: “Public Hearing” – 9:15 pm, Feb. 27, 2014

The following text is from a CORRA email: CORRA Update REVUE CINEMA – “PUBLIC HEARING” February 20, 2014 To CORRA Members, Resident and Ratepayer Executives: Passing along a cinema event “Public Hearing” by James N. Kienitz Wilkins (2012) that may … Continue reading

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Starting in the 1920s, gangster movies underlined the capabilities of talking pictures

In Chapter 16, “Gangs and Mobs,” in A Companion to Crime Fiction (2010), Jonathan Munby argues that crime fiction focusing on gangs and mobs can be viewed as a distinct tradition of gangster literature. I have earlier discussed whether film noir qualifies … Continue reading

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Narrative helps us understand Germany in the 1930s (Richard J. Evans, 2003)

In his first work in a trilogy about Nazi Germany, Richard J. Evans discusses the role of narrative in the writing of the history of Germany in the 1930s. Peter Burke, in History and Social Theory, Second Edition (2005), notes that … Continue reading

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