Preserved Stories Blog

Mimico Secondary Plan OMB Hearing resumes Tues., Feb. 2, 2016

The following message has been forwarded by Brian Bailey of the CCFEW (Citizens Concerned About the Future of the Etobicoke Waterfront):

The Ontario Municipal Board (OMB) hearing considering appeals of the Mimico by the Lake (Mimico 2020) secondary plan resumes on:

Tuesday, February 2nd, at 10:00 am

Location: 425 Adelaide St. West, 8th floor (MAP)

“We cannot let one landowner undo the work of many.”
Mimico Lakeshore Community Network

Final rounds in the tale of tall condo towers on the Shoreline Towers lot!!

The owners of Shoreline Towers have appealed the Mimico-by-the-Lake Secondary Plan to the Ontario Municipal Board (OMB) to allow for more big buildings on their property.

Last November, as part of their presentation before the OMB, the Shoreline Tower planner proposed a new potential redevelopment scenario, which would open the door for Shoreline to construct a tower of up to 15 storeys between the existing buildings and the lake, and later replace the existing buildings with two 25-storey towers. That would undo the great work of city planning staff and throw away the fruit of seven years of public consultations, wasting over half a million dollars of taxpayers’ money and setting the precedent for a free-for-all for builders of skyscrapers on the Mimico waterfront.

The hearing on the appeal resumes on Tuesday, February 2

Having a crowd of concerned residents at the first day of the resumed hearing will send a message to the Board that people care about the future of their neighbourhood.

Join us on February 2, 2016, 10:00 a.m., at 655 Bay Street, 16th Floor as we, the community, show strong support for the implementation of the Mimico-by-the-Lake Secondary Plan as approved by City Council.

We know the time is inconvenient for residents; it’s what suits the professionals! Please try to be there!

Mimico Lakeshore Community Network Inc.

lakeshorenetwork@gmail.com

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[End of text forwarded by CCFEW] 

 

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Two women scoping out cars (looking inside, checking doors) Thirty Seventh Street in Etobicoke, Jan. 29, 2016

Following item is from a recent post by a Long Branch resident at the Long Branch Neighbourhood Watch online group:

WARNING: A contractor was measuring my backyard on Friday (Jan 29 around 11:15 am) and saw two women scoping out cars (looking inside, checking doors) along 37th street. As they came to his truck he approached them and they became defensive, accusing him of staring at them and watching them.

His description of them:

Female 1: white, overweight, about 5’5”, reading glasses, with straight, dark brown, shoulder length hair, brown eyes, white jacket, running shoes

Female 2: white, also about 5’5”, sunglasses, grey/yellowing hair, passed her shoulders with big curls, a dark puffy hooded jacket, blue jeans and sunglasses, running shoes, and was riding a bicycle

[Age described as around 50.]

 

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TRCA/Sawmill Sid portable sawmilling project is now underway at Small Arms Building in Mississauga

Detail from Sawmill Sid project. Jaan Pill photo

Detail from TRCA/Sawmill Sid project. Jaan Pill photo

I recently learned about a small-scale portable sawmill operation run by Sawmill Sid and the Toronto and Region Conservation Authority (TRCA) near the historic Small Arms Building in Lakeview in Mississauga.

Sawmill Sid’s agreement to work on the site is with the TRCA.

Sawmill Sid is dedicated to portable sawmilling and wood repurposing in the Greater Toronto Area.

Click here for previous posts about the Small Arms Building >

Click here to access the Facebook Page of the Small Arms Society >

Sawmill Sid and the Small Arms Society

Sawmill Sid is working at the site in connection with an emerald ash borer infestation that has killed millions of ash trees in southwest Ontario and the Great Lakes States.

Click here for previous posts about the emerald ash borer >

A view of the fence at the south side of the Small Arms building, separating the lawn of the property from the parking lot, in a photo taken in the summer. This is among my favourite photos of the Arsenal Lands. It evokes, for this viewer, a sense of the atmosphere at the Small Arms building in the 1940s. Jaan Pill photo

A view of the fence at the south side of the Small Arms Building separating the lawn from the parking lot. Jaan Pill photo

The ash borer gets in between the bark and the trunk of ash trees and kills them. The trunk itself is unscathed and thus the wood can be reclaimed.

Entrepreneurship

The Sawmill Sid story comes down to a story about the application of entrepreneurship to a specified problem – in this case, what to do with dead ash trees.

Entrepreneurship, and the skills associated with it, is a key foundation for any kind of repurposing project, from what I have observed in recent years.

Volunteers with Habitat for Humanity Halton-Mississauga, Small Arms building, April 6, 2015. Jaan Pill photo

Volunteers with Habitat for Humanity Halton-Mississauga, Small Arms Building, April 6, 2015. Jaan Pill photo

In recent months, by way of example, I’ve been learning about the makeup of a new board of directors at the Small Arms Society. The board includes both the expertise that relates to archival and historical research, and the expertise that relates to strategic thinking and the conduct of business. That’s an essential combination.

In the strategy-related areas, the board members bring with them skills that involve, by way of example:

  • archival research
  • architectural design
  • project management
  • event planning
  • cultural planning
  • accounting
  • auditing
  • graphic design
  • communications, and
  • marketing

Repurposing entails challenges

A couple of stories that many people have been following in recent years are highlighted in the following links. I mention the stories by way of underlining the fact that repurposing frequently entails some major challenges.

Detail from Sawmill Sid project. Jaan Pill photo

Detail from TRCA/Sawmill Sid project. Jaan Pill photo

A Dec. 9, 2015 CBC article is entitled: “$650k plan to restore Mimico train station off the rails, community group says.”

A Jan. 28, 2016 Etobicoke Guardian article is entitled: “Rising heritage costs, bureaucracy the main reasons behind Wesley Mimico Place project’s cancellation: Mixed-use facility was to house seniors apartments and a community kitchen.”

A flashback to British Columbia

When in December 2015 I saw the logs that had been piled up at a temporary logging site near the Small Arms Building, I had a flashback to the time that I worked at a sawmill in British Columbia forty-five years ago. The sight of the logs brought back so many memories of many years ago.

In the early 1970s I took time off from university for a year of work in the bush.

At that time, I had a credit card debt of $1,000 to pay off.

I recently used an online Government of Canada inflation calculator to determine that in 2015 Canadian dollars, that was about $6,200 that I paid off.

Lac La Hache north of 100 Mile House along the Fraser Canyon

Detail from photo display at Sledgehammer Ceremony, April 6, 2015. Jaan Pill photo

Detail from photo display at Sledgehammer Ceremony at Small Arms Building, April 6, 2015. Jaan Pill photo

I began as a green-chain worker at a small sawmill near Lac La Hache. My job was to stack lumber into a range of categories after a log had been cut into boards.

I was fortunate that such work was available. In the years that followed, labour-intensive green chains for stacking lumber began to be replaced by computer-operated sorting systems, according to Richard A. Rahala in Up-Coast: Forests and Industry on British Columbia’s North Coast, 1870-2005 (2006).

Lac la Hache is a small community between 100 Mile House and Williams Lake in the interior of British Columbia.

Everything that I owned for that year including a cooking pot and a tiny camp stove that I used for cooking soybeans, I carried in a backpack. I had also bought a surplus Army jeep jacket to keep me warm.

Green chain at sawmill in a forest clearing

I found a small shack to rent close by the sawmill. I worked there from the fall of the year until the spring breakup at the start of the next year, when the unpaved road to the sawmill became impassable for logging trucks. I had my debt paid off by then.

Detail from Sawmill Sid project. Jaan Pill photo

Detail from TRCA/Sawmill Sid project. Jaan Pill photo

It was easy to find work in those days. I had stopped at a gas station at Lac La Hache while hitchhiking from Vancouver and asked if there were any jobs around. I learned that a local sawmill had an opening available and I signed up at once.

Prince Rupert and Haida Gwaii

After working at the sawmill through the fall and winter, I hitchhiked to Prince Rupert at the start of the spring breakup (when the ground was unthawing and exerting turned to mud) when the sawmill had shut down for a while. In Prince Rupert I slept overnight in the woods and the next day flew to Haida Gwaii (Queen Charlotte Islands) off the west coast of British Columbia south of Alaska. Once when I had been hitchhiking, a driver had impressed upon me that Haida Gwaii was well worth a visit. I decided to follow up on the suggestion.

I lived on Haida Gwaii for six weeks learning how to cut down trees in the Pacific rain forest. I was about to go into the business as a tree faller but the six-foot chainsaw that was required for the work cost $600 ($3,700 in 2015 dollars).

Councillor Jim Tovey tours the Small Arms building with a City of Mississauga Commissioner [details to follow]. Jaan Pill photo

Prior to April 6, 2015 Sledgehammer Ceremony, City of Mississauga Ward 1 Councillor Jim Tovey conducted a tour of the Small Arms building with Paul Mitcham, Commissioner of Community Services. Jaan Pill photo

When I sought to pay for it with my credit card (the same one that I had paid off), I found my credit wasn’t any good and I couldn’t buy the saw. That may have saved my life because I’m not really made out to be a tree faller.

Widow Makers in the Pacific rain forest

The work is dangerous. You have to cut a pathway through the bush to enable you to go running when the tree falls. Sometimes it bounces after it falls and who knows where it lands. There are also trees called Widow Makers in the bush – big trees that died decades ago but remain standing, propped up by other trees. When somebody walks through the bush, the Widow Makers become dislodged and they can fall upon anybody in the vicinity.

I learned all kinds of other terms for situations that can kill a logger; that one example provides an idea of what can happen. As well, people who’ve been felling trees with a chainsaw for some years can lose the capacity to feel anything, with their hands, because the constant vibration of the chainsaw can leave the hands totally numb as the years go by.

Detail from Sawmill Sid project. Jaan Pill photo

Detail from TRCA/Sawmill Sid project. Jaan Pill photo

Mountainside logging

So I flew back (in a tiny passenger seaplane) to the mainland and began working as a chockerman as part of a mountainside logging crew between Terrance and Kitimat on the B.C. mainland.

I was witness to some close calls while working on the mountainside.

I recall one worker’s comment, on one occasion where a person’s life could easily have been lost: “Close calls don’t count.”

Safety on the job, at sawmills and in logging operations, requires collaboration and good intentions on the part of many people. When such collaboration and good intentions are lacking, anything can happen.

I’ve recently thought about the fact that the same applies when people are sharing the roads and highways, anywhere.

Richard A. Rahala notes, in Clearcutting the Pacific Rain Forest (1998), that chockermen on logging crews had in many cases been replaced, by the mid-1970s, by mechanized grapple-yarding systems.

Detail from Sawmill Sid project. Jaan Pill photo

Detail from TRCA/Sawmill Sid project. Jaan Pill photo

Detraining

The chokerman job lasted for a while, long enough for my forearms to start to show the results of day to day chores putting cables around logs.

After that I went to work at an office job at an Alcan aluminum smelter in Kitimat and then went back to university. By that time the muscles in my arms had shrunk right back next to nothing; many decades later, when I began a program of strength training, I learned that the technical term for such shrinkage of muscles is called “detraining.”

The subtext to the story is that it’s a good idea to engage in regular, strenuous physical activity, as our bodies are not meant to be idle all the time.

Technological developments

I’ve recently thought among other things of the technological developments that have occurred in the logging and lumber industry in Canada during the past forty-five years.

I’ve also thought about the advances that have made portable sawmilling operations, such as the Sawmill Sid operation, possible.

Detail from Sawmill Sid project. Jaan Pill photo

Detail from TRCA/Sawmill Sid project. Jaan Pill photo

I’ve thought of so many things and have begun reading library books about the British Columbia forestry industry to find a way to position the industry, and my own fleeting experiential connection with it, in my mind.

Some places are great for camping, some are not

I’ve been working day after day trying to figure out what I had learned during that year of travel and work across the British Columbia interior. Part of the time I lived in a tent as I could save money that way.

One of the insights I gained is that every environment where a person sets up a tent is different. Some places are super comfortable and congenial for camping, some are not.

Grizzly bears (or maybe Queen Charlotte Islands black bears)

During my stay on Haida Gwaii I spent six weeks living in an improvised shelter in the roots of a giant hemlock tree at the edge of a rain forest near Queen Charlotte City. I found a huge tree whose roots had grown over a rotten log many years earlier.

Trees in the B.C. rain forests are enormous. I borrowed or rented a chain saw, removed the rotten log and found I had a suitable cavity to work with.

Photo from p. 119, Islands' Spirit Rising: Reclaiming the Forests of Haida Gwaii (2015) offers a sense of the forest ecology of Haida Gwaii. Caption reads: "Old forest ecosystem in Windy Bay, Lyell Island. (Richard Krieger)."

Photo from p. 119, Islands’ Spirit Rising: Reclaiming the Forests of Haida Gwaii (2015) offers a sense of the forest ecology of Haida Gwaii. Caption reads: “Old forest ecosystem in Windy Bay, Lyell Island. (Richard Krieger).”

In the interior of the cavity, I installed a layer of plastic sheeting and built a drainage ditch around the floor for water runoff when it rained.  The six weeks I spent living in the roots of the hemlock tree were among the best times that I remember from all of my years living in British Columbia. I was in B.C. from 1967 until I graduated from Simon Fraser University in 1974 and moved back east.

I would not see myself living out in the bush again, however. On the last night I was living in the tree, I heard something nearby and something told me I was in the presence of a bear. I had never had such an adrenalin rush in my life. I had a good sense of what bears are about. I had been at a logging camp some weeks earlier and had noticed an overturned fibreglass boat. Across the bottom of the boat were gouge marks that a grizzly bear (or maybe, as it occurs to me as I read more about these things, it was a Queen Charlotte Islands black bear) had made with the single swipe of a paw. The marks had impressed upon me what bears on Haida Gwaii are about.

Fortunately, it turned out that what I thought had been a bear turned out to be a false alarm. The next day or soon thereafter I was on my way back to the mainland.

Updates:

A subsequent post on related themes is entitled:

Great Bear Lake Rainforest agreement resolves conflict over logging in Canada’s coastal rainforest

A Sept. 23, 2014 article is entitled: “Earliest sign of human habitation in Canada may have been found: Possible 13,800-year-old fishing weir found in ocean near B.C.’s Haida Gwaii islands.”

A June 22, 2015 Global News article is entitled: “Footprints found on B.C.’s Calvert Island may be oldest on continent.”

Some resources of interest include: Home Truths: Highlights from BC History (2012) and Haida Gwaii: Human History and Environment from the Time of Loon to the Time of the Iron People (2005)

Details regarding the latter study can be accessed here.

 

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MPP Peter Milczyn: Transit Town Hall with Minister Steven Del Duca, Wed., Feb. 3, 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm, St Andrew’s Presbyterian Church, 3819 Bloor St. West

MilczynBaker_TransitTownhall_2016

Click on the image to enlarge it; click again to enlarge it further

 

On Wednesday, February 3, 2016, MPP Peter Milczyn will be hosting, with MPP Yvan Baker, a Transit Town Hall with Minister Steven Del Duca. Please see the attached flyer [below and above] for more details.

MilczynBaker_TransitTownhall_2016

The purpose of the townhall is to discuss investments already being made in transit and to seek public input on what local residents see as priorities. We hope you will be able to attend!

Office of Peter Milczyn, MPP
Etobicoke-Lakeshore
416-259-2249

 

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Lambton House provincial grant celebration: Lambton House, Sunday, Jan. 31, 2:00 pm

2016 HY Trillium Sunday Jan 31 poster[2]

 

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Caddying at Marlborough Golf Club in Montreal and other ways kids earned money fifty years ago

We’ve had some previous posts at this website concerned with the Marlborough Golf Club.

We’ve also had some posts in the past about Cartierville School.

I’ve recently been working on a post about the 1970-71 school year, when I took a year off from university to work at logging and sawmill jobs in the interior and west coast of British Columbia. I think it was the 1970-71 school year, anyway. In researching some previous texts that I’ve put together, regarding days gone by, I came across the following text which mentions Marlborough Golf Club. Here’s the text, for whatever value it may have, for site visitors.

Caddying

When I was in elementary school, my chores at home included washing dishes, peeling potatoes, and mowing the lawn. In exchange, I received an allowance of 25-cents a week. I also earned a little extra money by occasionally working as a caddy during the summers when I was about 10 or 11, at the Marlborough Golf Club not far from Cartierville School in Montreal, which I had attended during the primary grades.

The golf course had a caddy shack, where kids waited for the opportunity to go out to caddy. There was a waiting list, which was determined, at least partly, by when a particular caddy arrived at the caddy shack on a given day. An adult, in charge of the caddy shack, determined which caddies went to work for which golfers. We were paid about $1.25 per day plus a tip which was typically about 25-cents. In the late 1950s, that was a fair amount of money for a child. Comic books cost about 10 or 15 cents each, a magazine might be 35-cents, a newspaper was 5-cents, and my mother could buy a week’s worth of groceries for a family of four for $20.

I was too small to walk around with a bag of golf clubs over my shoulder. Possibly caddies who carried a golf bag earned a little more than those who pulled a cart. The work was straightforward. I would hand the golfer whichever club she or he suggested, pick up divots – divots being the clumps of grass and soil that would sometimes be dislodged after a golfer hit the ball – and replace them, and I would stand perfectly still whenever a golfer was preparing to hit the ball, or to putt on the greens. Typically we would cover the 18 holes as part of a foursome.

It was an impressive golf course – the greens were well looked after, and there were wooded areas adjacent to the course. I would bring along a hat for such occasions, as the sun often got extremely hot. I don’t remember much about the people I caddied for, except for one golfer in his early twenties, who commented that caddying must be an apt way for a child like me to earn a little extra money. One reason I didn’t go caddying very often was because, even if I turned up early in the morning at the caddy shack, there was no guarantee I would get a job that day.

I spent my money quickly. I don’t think I went caddying more than about 20 times in all. At one point I calculated that if I had saved my money instead of spending it at once, I would have saved over 20 dollars.

Newspaper routes

I had several friends who had newspaper routes when I was in elementary school. Occasionally I would help a friend on his route. Whether I got paid for helping him I do not recall. In the summers when I was in high school, I did not do much work. I wasn’t clear about how to go about applying for summer jobs. On one occasion, after I had graduated from high school, I answered a newspaper ad for a job picking worms, which were sold as bait for anglers. It was a job where I stayed up all night, and wandered around a golf course with a tin can attached to each leg just above the ankle.

I carried a flashlight, and pulled worms out of the ground. I was told that some people could make good money picking worms. Maybe they had awesome hand-eye coordination and showed the requisite enthusiasm and drive to excel at this task. In my case, my first night of worm picking was my last. The part I liked the most about the job was walking through the city – what part of Montreal we were in, I don’t recall; it might have been the east end – and seeing the streets very early in the morning, before anybody was awake.

Royal Victoria Hospital

When I was studying at McGill University, after high school, I worked at a part time job at the Royal Victoria Hospital, washing radioactive test tubes at a research lab. I wore a lead-lined apron to protect myself from radioactivity. The research involved rats. I didn’t stay with that job very long.

When I was still at McGill, I applied for a job at the Banff Springs Hotel. The availability of such work had been advertised on the McGill campus. I arranged for an interview and afterwards kept on phoning back to see if I had a job. I think it was my persistence in phoning back that landed me the position. Once I was in Banff, I learned that many of the students working there, from universities across Canada, had landed their jobs because of family connections. I was in a separate category. I was hired because my persistence somehow convinced the maitre d’ of the hotel, who had been conducting the interviews in Montreal, that I would be a good employee.

Banff Springs Hotel

I worked in Banff for three summers starting in the mid-1960s. I began as a busboy and in subsequent years worked as a room service waiter and doorman. In the next two summers, by which time I had transferred from McGill to the newly opened Simon Fraser University in B.C., I worked as a captain waiter at Jasper Park Lodge in Jasper, Alberta.

Those were wonderful summers – my first year in Banff was my first time away from home. During those summers I traveled extensively, on my days off, through the Canadian Rockies and as far as Montana. I also had a letter to the editor published in the Calgary Albertan, in which I spoke approvingly of the economic policies espoused by John Maynard Keynes, a British economist whose ideas, called Keynesian economics, had a major impact on modern economic and political theory as well as on the fiscal policies of many governments.

Jasper Park Lodge

In the late 1960s when I was working as a captain waiter at Jasper Park Lodge, a Canadian Rockies resort with a clientele similar to that of the Banff Springs Hotel, I had the good fortune to meet Pierre Elliot Trudeau, who at that time had recently been elected as Canada’s Prime Minister. When he walked into the dining room at the resort, people gave him a standing ovation. He wandered into the kitchen area later, shaking hands with people, and also kissing the young women – waitresses and other staff who like most of the front line staff were university students from across Canada – who were hanging out in that area. He got permission from the young women before he kissed them. I remember one waitress declined a kiss from Trudeau. I had the opportunity to shake hands with him at that time. He came across as a very energetic, good-natured, and courteous person on that occasion.

My summer jobs in university were a great way to earn extra money and meet new people, especially after the lack of jobs while I was in high school. I also enjoyed the transcontinental train rides on the Canadian Pacific Railway from Montreal to Banff in May, and the return ride to Montreal late in August or early September. Seeing the changing landscapes as we traveled across the Canadian countryside has always been a delightful experience for me.

Jaan Pill
Toronto, March 2008

 

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Posted in MCHS 2015 Stories, Newsletter, Toronto | 4 Comments

January 2016 Update from David Godley of Long Branch

The following text is from David Godley; I have waited for the go-ahead from him, before I proceeded to post this item. Because of time (and energy) constraints, I have done minimal formatting of this text.

The message includes two attached files:

crombie

97,27thomb

David Godley writes:

Happy 2016

Long Branch Neighbourhood Association.

The outlook is excellent for the formation of a strong Neighbourhood Association.

At the 7 December meeting of those citizens interested in being actively involved most are concerned about development issues.

Conservation of trees was a second priority followed by parks and safety.

Brian Liberty will send out minutes with a date for another meeting possibly February 1st.
There is plenty for the new body to address. Attached is a current review of some development issues based on the upcoming hearing on 97 27th Street.

Committee of Adjustment Applications

All proposals are for 3 storey houses. All except 29 Ash are severances. 29 Ash is a single house.

November 19, 2015 Committee of Adjustment Hearing

1. B30/15EYK, A259/15EYK & A260EYK – 33 Forty Second Street – In limbo because of Toronto Conservation Authority cocerns. It is in the flood plain. Plans will have to be revised if the applicant proceeds.

2. B51/15EYK, A463/15EYK & A464/15EYK – 58 Ash Crescent – Deferred for community meeting. We await word from the Planning Department on the format. The councillor’s office have set up a meeting to discuss mediation with Susanne Pringle, head of the Committee of Adjustment staff in Etobicoke YorkWe await word from the Planning Department on format.

December 3, 2015 Committee of Adjustment Hearing

1 B54/15EYK, A488/15EYK & A489/15EYK – 22 Thirtieth Street – Deferred for community meeting. The councillor’s office have set up a meeting to discuss mediation with Susanne Pringle, head of the Committee of Adjustment staff in Etobicoke YorkWe await word from the Planning Department on format.

2. B62/15EYK, A531/15EYK & A532/15EYK – 40 Thirty Eighth Street Application deferred for proper notification.

Reviewed Applications in Long Branch – Hearing date to be determined:

1. B68/15EYK, A697/15EYK & A59815EYK – 24 Thirty Third Street – This is an application for consent with associated minor variances. Staff have reviewed the application and are recommending a deferral to provide the applicant an opportunity to have further discussion with Planning staff and the community to develop a revised proposal that is more in keeping with the established physical character of the neighbourhood and more in accordance with the general intent and purpose of the Official Plan and the Zoning By-laws.

Minor variance applications in Long Branch in circulation:

1. B27/15EYK, A646/15EYK & A647/15EYK – 56 Ash Crescent – The is an application for consent with associated minor variances. Staff are currently reviewing the applications. More information to follow. Hearing date TBD

2. B75/15EYK, A667/15EYK & A668/15EYK – 2 Ash Crescent – The is an application for consent with associated minor variances. Staff are currently reviewing the applications. More information to follow. Hearing date TBD

3 B77/15EYK – 42 Exmoor, Severance and Variances submitted November 25.

New Consent and minor variance applications

1 29 Ash A231/15 A third application for the chicken coop house. The first was approved but overbuilt. An application for overbuilding was refused by Committee of Adjustment and an OMB hearing set for 23 February. In the meantime what I assume is a compromise variance is to go to the Committee of Adjustment on 11 January.

2 20 Garden Place B80/15,A716-7/15/EYK Hearing Date TBA

3 88 Laburnham Avenue B/85,A747-8/15/EYK Hearing Date TBA

OMB Hearings. 10am @ 655 Bay, the OMB offices.

1 97 27th, 14-15 January 2016 Mike Flynn who is leading the opposition on these applications has set up a meeting with help from the Councillor’s Office to meet staff for a strategy and inorma-15tion session on January 8th. The City represents City Council and not residents so it is important to have residents represesentation at all meetings. Liz Read, Christine Mercado, Andy Choles and Mike Laffrade are active in preparing for this hearing. Let them know if you wish to help.

2 29 Ash, 23 February 2016 Liz Read is taking aleadership role on this. A meeting with City Staff is the next step in the process and the initiative has to be through citizens perhaps through the Councillor’s Office (Daniel Fleming)

3 9 Atherton Appealed to OMB but hearing TBA.

Neighbourhood Tree Loss

Thank you to Bill Plewes for pointing out the owner of 2 27th Street is to be in Court for the desecration of 7 trees illegally. However trees continue to be lost because of limited resources for enforcement. Staff (although dedicated) are thin on the ground. A boundary tree has been lost at 48 35th and it is up to the part owner of the tree to hire a lawyer and persue the civil matter. Other single trees have been lost illegally and there are no plans to take the matter to court.

Urban Design Guidelines

This study has begun with Long Branch being one of the area to be studied. The City plan is to have the consultants develop templates for determining neighbourhood character to be used in other neighbourhoods. A local group will be needed to help with the study.
“The RFP for the Design Guidelines was issued on September 24 and the closing date for submissions is noon November 13 (tomorrow). The submissions will be reviewed by staff and this evaluation is to be completed by November 27. The expected date for the contract to start is December 7. The Project Manager for this initiative is James Parakh,(jparakh@toronto.ca) who is away until Monday. I’ve cc’ed James on this response who may be able to provide additional information when he returns.” Information provided by Neil Cresswell.

Establishing a Local Area Board (LAB)

A LAB would replace the OMB for appeals from Committee of Adjustment decisions.
The Executive Committee asked for a report by November and a report will be brought forward by the City Manager on 28th January. Thank you Neil Cresswell for pointing out this was not the duty of the Planning Department.

Review of the OMB

Hi David,

As you know we are going to undertake a review of the scope and effectiveness of the Ontario Municipal Board (OMB) in response to feedback from citizens, municipalities and our stakeholders. The Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing will work with the Ministry of the Attorney General, as well as key stakeholders, to recommend possible reforms that would improve the OMB’s role within the broader system of land-use planning. The government is currently looking at the most effective options for undertaking the review and will release details at a later date.

Regards,

Luke Fraser

Community Planner (A), Provincial Planning Policy Branch

Ministry of Municipal Affairs & Housing

13th Floor – 777 Bay St. Toronto, ON M5G 2E5

Phone: (416) 585-6088

Email: luke.fraser@ontario.ca

Crombie Review

See attached report by Brian Graff:

crombie

Toronto Star Article on NIMBYism (2 January 2016).

Comment from David Godley

Great to see Ed Keenan focus on NIMBYism. It is a term used liberally by proponents to describe opposition to development.

Like “Do gooder” it has negative connotations despite the real meaning of the words.
Not in my back yard is often good planning.

However NIMBYism can do real harm such as the gas plant cancellations.

At the neighbourhood level, especially in Toronto, the word NIMBY contributes to detrimental impacts.

The Official Plan clearly spells out that neighbourhood character must be respected and reinforced.

However the Ontario Municipal Board rarely heeds this fundamental strategy.

Consequently neighboourhoods are being routinely butchered especially in North York and Lakeshore.

The issue is that there is no level playing field in the planning process. Citizens suddenly are faced with a proposal that severely impacts not only the street scene (including destruction of trees) but their whole quality of life. They have 2 weeks to respond by collecting information learning about the complex issues of severances and variances and learning to comment positively. Individual citizens are put under severe stress to such an extent that they sometimes leave the neighbourhood. If a proposal is refused locally, the applicant appeals to the development-friendly OMB.

We will continue to wreck our neighbourhoods unless the City turns back to using citizen stakeholders Neighbourhood Planning or the OMB ceases to abuse City planning.

I am looking forward to Ed Keenan’s next article on the positive side of NIMBYism.

Yours truly

David Godley

Comments and/or additional information are gladly received

Back issues of the Update can be found on Jaan Pill’s blog “preservedstories.com” as well as other Long Branch planning matters.

David

 

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New construction route approved for Lakeview Waterfront Connection

Following message is from Port Credit Conservation:

Construction of a new waterfront conservation area in the Lakeview community is scheduled to begin in mid-2016 via a new construction route just approved by the Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change. The route provides a more streamlined construction process with fewer impacts to the public.

The construction route runs along the eastern boundary of the Ontario Power Generation (OPG) lands, where the Lakeview Power Generating Station once stood. The new route is a welcomed change for many Lakeview residents and visitors to Etobicoke’s Marie Curtis Park. The previous route would have construction access routed through the Arsenal Lands in the southeast corner of Mississauga and a portion of Etobicoke’s Marie Curtis Park. The new route required approval from the Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change since it involved an amendment to the project’s environmental assessment (originally approved May 27, 2015).

Members of the public and government agencies were given the opportunity to comment on the new route from November 27, 2015 to January 4 2016. All comments received were in support of the revised route.

The effort to construct the new conservation area is called the Lakeview Waterfront Connection. It is a joint project of the Region of Peel, Credit Valley Conservation and Toronto and Region Conservation Authority with ongoing review and support from the cities of Mississauga and Toronto. Learn more about the Lakeview Waterfront Connection at http://lakeviewwaterfrontconnection.ca.

Copyright © 2016 Credit Valley Conservation, All rights reserved.
You signed up to receive e-newsletters and periodic updates on the Lakeview Waterfront Connection project.

Our mailing address is:
Credit Valley Conservation
1255 Old Derry Rd.
Mississauga, Ontario L5N 6R4
Canada

 

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Reports of dead raccoons & dogs with marijuana poisoning in Humber College & Colonel Samuel Smith Park area

From Long Branch Neighbourhood Watch:

Reports of dead raccoons & dogs with marijuana poisoning in the Humber College and Colonel Samuel Smith Park area. Keep your cats indoors and dogs on leash.

Etobicoke Guardian article

A Jan. 28, 2016 Etobicoke Guardian article is entitled: “Useful tips, in aftermath of suspected dog poisoning cases in south Etobicoke.”

 

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Compilation of list of names for photo of Mrs. Bell’s Grade 7 class at Ahuntsic School, 1958

First Row (left to right) Leila Zogbi,  Emily,  Mrs. Mayberry- Principal,  Allister High,  Audrey McHafferie,  Mrs. Kathleen Bell-Class Teacher,  Alex Simard,  Helen Eisenstein Second Row (left to right) Marilyn Robertson-Office Admin,  Richard Lessard,  Raynauld Beauhemin, Collen McKenna,  Annette Bingham,  Elizabeth Forester,  Nina Sharko,  Sandra Shaar,  Lise Decoste,  Peter Bears,  Peter Blendong,   Pierre.  Mrs. Craig-Music Teacher Third Row  (left to right) Arthur,  Peter,  Johnny,  Richard Scannell,  Michael,  Robert Horricks,  Henry,  Brian,  Keith Davis. Photo source: Noreen (Doherty) McMillan

First Row (left to right)
Leila Zogbi, Emily, Mrs. Mayberry – Principal, Allister High, Audrey McHafferie, Mrs. Kathleen Bell – Class Teacher, Alex Simard, Helen Eisenstein
Second Row (left to right)
Marilyn Robertson – Office Admin, Richard Lessard, Raynauld Beauhemin, Colleen McKenna, Annette Bingham, Elizabeth Forester, Nina Sharko, Sandra Shaar, Lise Decoste, Peter Bears, Peter Blendong, Pierre. Mrs. Craig – Music Teacher
Third Row (left to right)
Arthur, Peter, Johnny, Richard Scannell, Michael, Robert Horricks, Henry, Brian, Keith Davis. Photo source: Noreen (Doherty) McMillan

Noreen (Doherty) McMillan writes:

Hello Jaan,

I am re-sending herewith the photo of Mrs. Bell’s Grade 7 class in Ahuntsic Elementary of 1958.

With the help of my dear friends, Lise Decoste (Laval, Que.), Nina Sharko (Rockledge, Florida), and Marsha Silver (Orleans, Ont.) we have compiled as many names as possible. (Last names not always possible)

Lise Decoste has been communicating with the Montreal Protestant School Board in an effort to retrieve a photo of the other Grade 7 Class of Mrs. Harris, without success to date. We have not given up as yet.

Please re-post and credit the three ladies listed who have bee instrumental in this endeavor.

Regards,

Noreen Doherty-McMillan

[End of message]

Click on the photo to enlarge it; click again to enlarge it further

Noreen Doherty-McMillan (MCHS 1962) has listed the following names:

First Row (left to right)
Leila Zogbi, Emily, Mrs. Mayberry – Principal, Allister High, Audrey McHafferie, Mrs. Kathleen Bell – Class Teacher, Alex Simard, Helen Eisenstein

Second Row (left to right)
Marilyn Robertson – Office Admin, Richard Lessard, Raynauld Beauhemin, Colleen McKenna, Annette Bingham, Elizabeth Forester, Nina Sharko, Sandra Shaar, Lise Decoste, Peter Bears, Peter Blendong, Pierre. Mrs. Craig – Music Teacher

Third Row (left to right)
Arthur, Peter, Johnny, Richard Scannell, Michael, Robert Horricks, Henry, Brian, Keith Davis

Please note: In the list, I have changed Collen McKenna to Colleen McKenna. I am guessing that “Collen” was a typo. I mention  this, just in case I am mistaken in my guess.

 

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