Preserved Stories Blog

Hidden Figures (2016): A great movie; I recommend it highly

The image is from the Jan. 9, 2017 Atlantic article mentioned at the post you are now reading.

The image is from the Jan. 9, 2017 Atlantic article mentioned at the post you are now reading. Image source: 20th Century Fox

In the course of my life, I have been inspired by decency, honesty, fairness, and genuine (as opposed to fake) justice.

It’s been my observation that the pursuit of such qualities as decency, honesty, and so on, appeals to some more than to others.

Thus I must say that I was very moved – tears welled up in my eyes, and my throat felt very tight – when I began to view Hidden Figures (2016), at an old movie theatre not too far from where I live in Long Branch. This is one awesome movie. I am pleased I have lived long enough to have “been there’ in the early 1960s, during the era that us depicted in the film. Thus at that level along with other levels, I can relate to Hidden Figures.

I am pleased as well that a part of me still functions well, despite the passage of the years. That is an aspect of my being that is moved, deeply moved, when I witness kindness, honesty, and people working together in pursuit of the common good.

If you haven’t seen the film, I recommend you see it. I recommend it highly.

Updates

The image is from the April 14, 2017 Climate Central article mentioned at the post you are now reading.

The image is from the April 14, 2017 Climate Central article mentioned at the post you are now reading.

NASA is a character, among many others, in the movie. An April 14, 2017 Climate

Central article, which highlights temperature data from NSA, is entitled: “March Was Second Hottest on Record Globally.”

In Secondhand Time: The Last of the Soviets, First U.S. Edition (2016) by Svetlana Aleksievich, the Nobel-laureate author, there are references to the 1960s space race between the United States and the Soviet Union. I recommend the book highly; it provides a good sense, from a perspective from the other side of the world, of the 1960s era depicted in Hidden Higures.

Context plays a key role, in the event the format of the story permits such a focus

A Jan. 9, 2017 Atlantic article is entitled: “What Sets the Smart Heroines of Hidden Figures Apart: Movies about brilliant scientific or mathematical minds often focus on their subject’s ego – not so with a new film about three African American women who worked at NASA in the ’60s.”

The above-mentioned article notes that the film emphasizes context and collaboration rather than making any given individual the primary focus. That is an aspect of the film that I had not thought about, until I read the article.

I see a connection, in this respect, to the success that Fiona Hill and Clifford Gaddy have achieved, in developing a powerful study of contemporary Russian political life by focusing on formative influences and publicly available texts related to key players. In the latter case, the study features cogent storytelling even in (and to some extent, I think, as a result of) the absence of verifiable biographical details, regarding a particular individual.

It is of interest, as well, that the key role of context, as contrasted to a focus solely on the individual, is also emphasized in Sensemaking: The Power of the Humanities in the Age of the Algorithm (2017).

 

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John Stewart of Wiarton has added a comment to a previous post about the 1958 fire at the Long Branch Hotel

Long Branch Hotel map. Bill Rawson, May 2013

A map from the Long Branch Historical Society shows the shoreline of Lake Ontario as it existed during the years before the Long Branch Hotel burned down.

Part of the route for the May 4, 2013 Jane’s Walk in Long Branch is indicated on a Long Branch subdivisions map. The map shows where infill was added to the shoreline at a relatively recent stage of the community’s history. It may also be noted that before the infill, Lake Promenade did not extend in front of the property where the Long Branch Hotel was located. It terminated on either side of the property as the previous map (please see directly above), from the Long Branch Historical Society, indicates.

Walk route superimposed on Long Branch Subdivisions map

June 28, 2016 Long Branch Urban Design Guidelines Walking Tour route, superimposed on Long Branch Subdivisions map. Click on image to enlarge it.

John Stewart of Wiarton has added a comment to a previous post about the fire at the Long Branch hotel; he writes:

“Our family grew up on 31 Arcadian Circle from 1939 to 1998. I remember the Long Branch hotel fire and even have slide pictures of it. It actually was during the winter early in the new year as I too remember how big the rats were and how bitterly cold it was that the rats ran back in. My father in law Harold Hall a volunteer fireman fell from the top floor into the basement when the floor caved in and injured his back.The next day all that was left standing were the old cast iron pipes still sticking up and the basement walls thick with ice. My sisters and I went to the old James S. Bell school where I met my future wife June Underhill of Ash Crescent in Mrs. Salter’s grade six class. My wonderful memories of Long Branch are more than I could ever hope to put on line. I now live in Wiarton and love to tell my friends there the stories of growing up in Long Branch. Thanks for creating this site.”

Thank you, John

Thank you, John, for posting this comment. I am delighted to read your corroboration of a previous comment regarding the rats. It is comments such as your that truly add value to this website. Would it be possible for us to post some of the slides that you mention? Please contact me if it may be possible for me to arrange to get jpeg images of the slides. I am very pleased that this website enables us to share such great stories about Long Branch of years ago. I have made a point of posting your comment as an additional, separate post, by way of bringing attention to the previous post and all of the great comments that have been added to it:

A Long Branch resident passed along to Barry Kemp this photo of the Eastwood Park Hotel

The text at the latter site brings to mind for me how much I’ve learned about Long Branch history in recent years, starting with the fact that few biographical details about Colonel Samuel Smith, the first European settler in Long Branch, are available:

Colonel Samuel Smith and the management of organized violence (which, as it turns out, is what military leadership entails)

Some years ago, I developed an interest in the story of Colonel Samuel Smith, about whom I have written at some length in years past, at this website. There is relatively little known, by way of archival and historical evidence, regarding the colonel, who in the late 1700s and early 1800s owned all of the land that is now known as Long Branch, the Toronto neighbourhood where I have lived for 20 years, and who owned land beyond the borders of Long Branch as well.

Because little is known about the colonel, in the historical record, I began to read about the history of the British empire, First Nations history, and the world history of warfare. Such reading has enabled me to get a good understanding of what the colonel’s life and career – and the life and career of a friend of his, John Graves Simcoe, about whom more biographical details are known – were about. Biography can only explain a finite amount about a person’s life and behaviour. That’s a key insight that I have gained, from my study of the context of Colonel Samuel Smith’s life, and from my other study in recent years of aspects of local, regional, national, and world history.

The above-noted comments about Colonel Samuel Smith tie in with my current study of namthe theory and practice of story management.

A library book available at the Long Branch Library claims the Long Branch Hotel burned down in 1955. The correct date is 1958. Similarly, the colonel’s log cabin, built in 1797, was bulldozed in 1955 not 1952. I like to keep track of such details, as I like to adopt an evidence-based approach to the study of local history. That means I like to do fact-checking, rather than repeating what some other amateur historian (I am an amateur historian myself) has said.

Click on the images to enlarge them; click again to enlarge them further

From time to time, I mention the Long Branch Historical Society. It’s my hope that in maybe 20 years, the society will be up and running again. Some years ago, it ran into organizational issues and went into a prolonged state of dormancy as a result. I owe thanks to the fact that, while it was in operation, it gave rise to valuable networking opportunities for me among other people. In posts in recent years I’ve also mentioned the launch of the Long Branch Neighbourhood Association. The foundations for the latter association are well in place. I know that because I was involved in the discussions, which involved input from many residents, leading to the development of its bylaws and operating structure. It’s my hope that the latter association will be up and running in the next while. Such an association has the potential to add much of value to our community.

 

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Etobicoke York Community Council postpones designation of 68 Daisy Ave. under Ontario Heritage Act

Previous posts regarding Daisy Ave. in Long Branch and the Ontario Heritage Act can be accessed here.

Here is a City of Toronto link regarding 68 Daisy Ave.

The following text regarding 68 Daisy Ave. is from a link at the City of Toronto website.

Please click on the link above, to access the links mentioned in the text below. I have not added live links to the text below. As a volunteer, I want to make the best possible use of my time; anyone who wishes to access the links can start by accessing the link at the top of the the page you are now reading.

The text reads:

This item was considered by Etobicoke York Community Council on April 4, 2017. The Etobicoke York Community Council postponed consideration of this item. Consult the text of the decision for further information on the deferral.

Etobicoke York Community Council consideration on April 4, 2017
EY21.9

ACTION

Deferred

Ward:6

Intention to Designate under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act – 68 Daisy Avenue

Statutory – Ontario Heritage Act, RSO 1990
Community Council Decision

Caution: This is a preliminary decision. This decision should not be considered final until the meeting is complete and the City Clerk has confirmed the decisions for this meeting.
Etobicoke York Community Council deferred consideration of this Item to its meeting on May 2, 2017.

Origin

(February 28, 2017) Report from the Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning Division

Summary

This report recommends that City Council state its intention to designate the property at 68 Daisy Avenue under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act for its cultural heritage value.

The property contains the two-and-a-half storey, brick clad school building, completed in 1929 and additions completed in 1956 and 1963-4. Originally known as the Daisy Avenue Public School and now known as the Vincent Massey Childcare Centre, the property was included on the City of Toronto’s Heritage Register in 2006.

Following research and evaluation, staff have determined that the property at 68 Daisy Avenue meets Ontario Regulation 9/06, the provincial criteria prescribed for municipal designation under the Ontario Heritage Act. Properties on the Heritage Register will be conserved and maintained in accordance with Official Plan Heritage Policies. Designation enables City Council to review alterations to the site, enforce heritage property standards and maintenance, and refuse demolition.
Financial Impact

There are no financial implications resulting from the adoption of this report.

Background Information

(February 28, 2017) Report from the Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning Division regarding an Intention to Designate under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act – 68 Daisy Avenue

(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ey/bgrd/backgroundfile-101765.pdf)

Speakers

Jan Halcovitch, Vincent Massey Child Care
Brian Mooney, Chair, Etobicoke York Community Preservation Panel

9a Intention to Designate under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act – 68 Daisy Avenue

Recommendations

The Toronto Preservation Board recommends to the Etobicoke York Community Council that:

1. City Council state its intention to designate the property at 68 Daisy Avenue under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act, in accordance with the Statement of Significance: 68 Daisy Avenue (Reasons for Designation) attached as Attachment 3 to the report (February 28, 2017) from the Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning.

2. If there are no objections to the designation in accordance with the Ontario Heritage Act, City Council authorize the City Solicitor to introduce the necessary bill in Council designating the property under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act

3. If there are objections in accordance with the Ontario Heritage Act, City Council direct the City Clerk to refer the designation to the Conservation Review Board.

4. If the designation is referred to the Conservation Review Board, City Council authorize the City Solicitor and appropriate staff to attend any hearing held by the Conservation Review Board in support of Council’s decision on the designation by-law.
Origin

(March 21, 2017) Letter from the Toronto Preservation Board

Summary

The Toronto Preservation Board on March 23, 2017, considered the following:

1. Report (February 28, 2017) from the Chief Planner and Executive Director, City Planning regarding Intention to Designate under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act – 68 Daisy Avenue.

2. Communications:

a. (March 22, 2017) Letter from Ann Lam, Vice President Development, Dunpar Homes (PB.Supp.PB21.5.1)
(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pb/comm/communicationfile-67769.pdf)

b. (March 22, 2017) Letter from Jan Halcovitch, Finance & Admissions Director, Vincent Massey Child Cares (PB.Supp.PB21.5.2)

(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/pb/comm/communicationfile-67770.pdf)

Background Information

(March 21, 2017) Letter from the Toronto Preservation Board regarding 68 Daisy Avenue – Intention to Designate under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act

(http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2017/ey/bgrd/backgroundfile-102445.pdf)

Source: Toronto City Clerk at www.toronto.ca/council

[End of text]

 

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An exemplary study in story management: Mr. Putin: Operative in the Kremlin (2015)

I’ve been reading with interest a Brookings Institution study entitled: Mr. Putin: Operative in the Kremlin (2015).

The way the book itself is constructed is a study in effective story management. As well, the contents of the book – featuring a cogent overview of the past and current impact of Russian history – constitute an exemplary study in story management, as demonstrated in the authors’ timely narrative of the life and times of the current Russian president.

I’ve outlined reasons for my interest in the Brookings study at a previous post:

Mr. Putin (2015) illustrates that story management is possible even in the absence of evidence-based biographical details

I have an interest in this study in particular because it have given rise to many insights for me, regarding how stories work, and how they are managed.

I have a strong interest in the fact that so much can be explained regarding the past and present of Vladimir Putin even in the absence of solid biographical data.

I am impressed, as well, with how this Brookings study has been able to draw out information related to people’s formative life experiences, and in that process arrive at a coherent story about what a given person’s mind-set and world view happens to be, with particular relevance to what is happening in the news right now, on any given day.

Colonel Samuel Smith and the management of organized violence (which, as it turns out, is what military leadership entails)

I can connect to the strategy that Fiona Hill and Clifford Caddy, the authors of the study in question, have adopted. Some years ago, I developed an interest in the story of Colonel Samuel Smith, about whom I have written at some length in years past, at this website. There is relatively little known, by way of archival and historical evidence, regarding the colonel, who in the late 1700s and early 1800s owned all of the land that is now known as Long Branch, the Toronto neighbourhood where I have lived for 20 years, and who owned land beyond the borders of Long Branch as well.

Because little is known about the colonel, in the historical record, I began to read about the history of the British empire, First Nations history, and the world history of warfare. Such reading has enabled me to get a good understanding of what the colonel’s life and career – and the life and career of a friend of his, John Graves Simcoe, about whom more biographical details are known – were about. Biography can only explain a finite amount about a person’s life and behaviour. That’s a key insight that I have gained, from my study of the context of Colonel Samuel Smith’s life, and from my study of Fiona Hill and Clifford Caddy’s excellent overview of Mr. Putin’s mind-set and world view.

The Story of Mississauga

This personal study has proceeded within the context of a wider area of study, namely the study of what stories are about, and how they work. The concept of story management, as distinct from storytelling, is of particular relevance for me, at this stage of my reading and thinking about these topics. The Story of Mississauga project has in particular prompted my interest in understanding how story management  – as a concept and practice related to heritage management – works.

Mr. Putin is not experienced in dealing with hostile crowds

The foregoing comments are a preamble to the following quotation (p. 183) from Mr. Putin: Operative in the Kremlin (2015).

Having closely read all of the rest of the book, this is a passage that really stands out for me:

The les­sons Putin then learned during his time in St. Petersburg in dealing with businesses propelled him to Moscow in 1996. He came to Moscow and embarked on a mission that did not require the application of his lim­ited economic or political skills. He was not supposed to provide input into policy or deal with mobs. He was called up almost as a “sleeper operative” to work for people in the Kremlin and eventually deal with businesses and businessmen, as he had done in St. Petersburg. The methods for exerting leverage he had developed in St. Petersburg were his key strengths. The other tools at his disposal would become relevant later when he began to move rapidly up the leadership ladder in Mos­cow. Only when he got to the top would some of his weaknesses – like dealing with hostile crowds – prove problematic.

[End]

Updates

An April 13, 2016 (note it’s 2016) Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists article by Fiona Hill is entitled: “The one-man show the West doesn’t understand.”

An April 13, 2017 Guardian article is entitled: “British spies were first to spot Trump team’s links with Russia: Exclusive: GCHQ is said to have alerted US agencies after becoming aware of contacts in 2015.”

An April 16, 2017 Guardian article is entitled: “Hungary’s liberals find a hero in their battle against Viktor Orbán: Academic Michael Ignatieff’s stand for academic freedom has gained attention.”

An April 19, 2017 Reuters article is entitled: “Exclusive: Putin-linked think tank drew up plan to sway 2016 U.S. election – documents.”

Peel Regional Police and the Story of Mississauga

The following topic is of relevance with regard to what will be features as integral to the Story of Mississauga: An April 22, 2017 Toronto Star article is entitled: “Peel police discriminated against decorated officer based on race, rights tribunal rules: Peel police discriminated against a South Asian officer and devalued the South Asian community, a human rights tribunal has ruled.”

 

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Was very impressed with Indigenous Cultural Competency Training session on April 18, 2017 at Mississauga Valley Community Centre

You can access the following message from Mississauga Culture at this link.

The message reads:

Indigenous Cultural Competency Training

When: April 18, 2017 9 a.m. – noon

Where: Mississauga Valley Community Centre, 1275 Mississauga Valley Blvd.

 

“We acknowledge that this land is situated within the traditional territory of the Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nation and previously to the Anishinaabe, Haudenosaunee, Wyndot and Huron people.We gratefully acknowledge the many Aboriginal, Inuit, Métis and global residents who call Mississauga home”

 

As part of the Canada 150 celebrations focused on the Year of Truth and Reconciliation, the City of Mississauga’s Culture Division is concentrating on continuing to build strong and respectful partnerships with the Indigenous community.

To help us achieve this goal and help Mississauga residents understand both the historical and contemporary issues facing the Indigenous community, the Culture Division is hosting a half-day session on Indigenous Cultural Competency.

This training session will be led by Michael Etherington, Manager of Culture Programs, Native Canadian Centre Toronto.

In the session, Michael will explain how we can create a platform for promoting cultural competency for Indigenous relations.

The content of the session will include an overview of terminology and definitions, statistics and demographical information, historical events and their impacts on cultural identity and contemporary issues facing Indigenous people.

Kris Noakes, President, Peel Aboriginal Network will be delivering an introduction to the exercise.

The Native Canadian Centre Toronto is Toronto’s oldest Indigenous community organization and one of the original Friendship Centres in Canada. It provides social, recreational, cultural and spiritual services for the Indigenous community and visitors alike.

 

Register Now 

Twitter

Follow @SaugaCulture to stay up to date with Mississauga Culture news!

Facebook

Like Mississauga Culture on Facebook to keep up with our news, updates and other discussions!

City of Mississauga Culture Division
201 City Centre Drive, Suite 202
Mississauga, Ontario L5B 2T4

[End]

Click here for an additional details about Michael Etherington’s work >

Updates

A Jan. 14, 2017 CBC article is entitled: “Reconciliation more than land acknowledgments, Indigenous groups say: As more powerful groups — like Winnipeg Jets — make statements, critics worry it could become ‘formality'”.

An April 23, 2017 Big Think article is entitled: “Discovery of North America’s Oldest Settlement Proves Native Canadian Legend True.”

 

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Aboriginal Movie Café (April 13, 2017) and Indigenous Knowledge Certificate at Humber College Lakeshore Campus

I am pleased to share with you the following April 3, 2017 message from Kevin Vose-Landivar of Humber College, who notes that these events are open to any interested member of the community:

Good evening,

I hope you had a great weekend and are enjoying the nice temperatures we’ve been lucky to have! I am sending out one event and another informational poster to notify any and all interested community members!

The information for the events (dates, places and times) are located on each flyer [please see below].

We are located in the Welcome Centre at the Humber College Lakeshore Campus at 2 Colonel Samuel Smith Park Drive right on the corner of Kipling and Lakeshore, our office is WEL 301, third first of the Welcome Center.

The Aboriginal Resource Centre WILL be closed the 5th-7th of April, this coming Wednesday, Thursday and Friday for an Aboriginal Envisioning Event we will be attending. Please let any community members know if they do wish to visit us for these three days.

Two Events:

*

Aboriginal Movie Café (Held at the Humber College Lakeshore Campus)

This Month’s Aboriginal Movie Café will feature Smoke Signals. As usual, snack will be provided to attendees. All Welcome!

See the film trailer here:

 

 

Synopsis:

Smoke Signals is a humorous yet serious story about Victor, a young man who Director Chris Eyre describes as “trying to forgive his father.” The movie gives us a glimpse into the contemporary Native American world, and is created by an almost exclusively Native American cast.

 

Aboriginal Movie Café

 

Indigenous Knowledge Certificate (IKN) (Held At Humber College Lakeshore Campus)

With the upcoming Summer semester just ahead of us, we are offering the IKN 100: Creation Story course, which is one of the four Indigenous Knowledge courses offered to anyone wishing to learn more about the Indigenous community. Further information could be found by clicking this link:

Indigenous Knowledge Certificate of Achievement | INDIGENOU_CA

 

Indigenous Knowledge Certificate

 

Thank you again and have a great week!

Kevin Vose-Landivar

 

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March 2017 newsletter of Friends of Fort York can be accessed here

An aerial view of Fort York looking east shows the substantial progress on the Visitor Centre that’s been made by 2013. Photo by Danny Williams. Source: October 2013 Fife & Drum newsletter published by The Friends of Fort York and Garrison Common

The March 2017 issue of the Friends of Fort York newsletter can be accessed here.

The opening paragraphs of the opening article read:

“The first Fort York, built by John Graves Simcoe in 1793, had mostly been demolished by the end of the eighteenth century. When in 1987 archaeologists investigating a feature in the area between the South Soldiers’ Brick Barracks and the Southwest Bastion within Fort York’s ramparts uncovered what were thought to be remnants of a limestone-cobble foundation for one of the first fort’s buildings, they weren’t exactly surprised. (Fig. 1) But neither did it lead anywhere. The find was carefully recorded before being covered up again.

“What is known today about Toronto’s original garrison is embarrassingly little. No site plan has been found. Only a few contemporary sketches survive, but they are not detailed ones. The absence of diaries and letters of soldiers stationed there in the 1790s leaves much to be inferred from military muster rolls, spending estimates, and reports.”

[End]

The significance of the year 1793

The paragraphs being to mind a previous post, entitled:

Karolyn Smardz Frost (2007) documents the story of Thornton and Lucie Blackburn who “stole themselves” from slavery

 

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Vimy Ridge Weekend at Fort York – Saturday, April 8, 2017 and Sunday, April 9, 2017 at 10 am to 5 pm

vimy 1140x200*v2

 

Click here for previous posts about the First World War >

The following information is from the Events at Fort York page at the City of Toronto website.

The link in the previous sentence includes a detailed timetable of events.

Vimy Ridge Weekend at Fort York – Saturday, April 8, 2017 and Sunday, April 9, 2017 at 10 am to 5 pm

The City of Toronto honours the 100th anniversary of the Battle of Vimy Ridge on April 8 and 9, 2017 at Fort York National Historic Site. On April 8 the public will experience educational programming and First World War re-enactor displays of infantry, artillery, cavalry, medicine, music and food as well as Great War related exhibits and films.

Trench Warfare. Photo taken by an official British photographer during WWI, 1917. Source: History In Pictures ‏@HistoryInPics. Click on the image to enlarge it.

On April 9 a military remembrance parade and commemorative service by the Canadian Armed Forces will later be followed by the dedication of a Vimy oak tree within Garrison Common. The commemorative service will be attended by Mayor John Tory and the Lieutenant Governor of Ontario, the Honourable Elizabeth Dowdeswell as well as other dignitaries. VIMY 100 Toronto is part of the City’s Canada 150 TO Canada with Love program.

[End]

Updates

A March 31, 2017 (or thereabouts) Globe and Mail article is entitled: “Vimy Ridge: Birthplace of a nation – or of a Canadian myth?: The battle, which marks its 100th anniversary this year, has long been touted as the defining event that unified Canada. Whether or not it did, its symbolism endures.”

An excerpt reads:

Naval guns fire during the battle at Vimy Ridge in April, 1917. NATIONAL ARCHIVES OF CANADA. The image is rom the Globe and Mail article highlighted at the post you are now reading.

Naval guns fire during the battle at Vimy Ridge in April, 1917. National Archives of Canada. The image is from the Globe and Mail article highlighted at the post you are now reading. Click on the image to enlarge it.

“Two recent books take up the quarrel from opposing sides, adding to a long shelf of Vimy literature. Military historian Tim Cook’s cautiously celebratory Vimy: the Battle and the Legend is the revised standard gospel, insisting on the resilience of the legend while acknowledging that the subject is ‘a layered skein of stories, myths, wishful thinking and conflicting narratives.’  Ian McKay and Jamie Swift’s The Vimy Trap, a finalist for this year’s Shaughnessy Cohen Prize for Political Writing, is an impatient piece of debunkery that sees Vimy as a propaganda tool used to justify more recent conflicts, including the war in Afghanistan.”

[End]

An April 8, 2017 CBC article is entitled: “Brockville-area soldier came home from Vimy honoured — but scarred: Thain Wendell MacDowell waged his own war against shell shock after the 1917 battle.”

Email from Geoff Kettel

By way of a further update, Geoff Kettel has shared the following news release. You will need to cut and paste the links, included in the news release, as I do not have time (being a volunteer blogger, as I am) to make them into live links.

News Release

April 3, 2017

City of Toronto to commemorate Battle of Vimy Ridge centennial anniversary

The City of Toronto will honour the 100th anniversary of the Battle of Vimy Ridge (VIMY 100 Toronto) at Fort York National Historic Site with a weekend of free events culminating in a commemorative ceremony on April 9 in collaboration with the Canadian Armed Forces.

At the April 9 ceremony, Mayor John Tory will be joined by the Lieutenant Governor of Ontario, the Honourable Elizabeth Dowdeswell; the Premier of Ontario, the Honourable Kathleen Wynne and other dignitaries.

“I am proud to be part of this significant event that remembers the sacrifices of our soldiers. Vimy Ridge forged the character of our country and its historic importance continues to resonate a century later,” said Mayor Tory. “It is of utmost importance that we share the memories that have been passed down from generation to generation so that the children of the future understand the significance of Vimy Ridge and why so many made the ultimate sacrifice so that we can live in peace and freedom today. I encourage everyone to attend the events at Fort York this weekend.”

“The Battle of Vimy Ridge was a defining moment for Canada – a turning point in our collective memory when we came into our own as a nation,” said Premier Wynne. “Thousands of young Canadians lost their lives. I encourage everyone to attend the events at Fort York this weekend as we mark the 100th anniversary of this historic battle. By joining together to honour the legacy of Vimy Ridge, we will remember the great courage and sacrifice of Canada’s soldiers in the First World War, and pay our respects to every serviceman and woman who has died protecting our freedom and our way of life.”

A military parade and commemorative service by the Canadian Armed Forces will take place on April 9 at 2 p.m. and will be followed by the dedication of a Vimy oak tree within Fort York’s Garrison Common. Fort York will be open to the public from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Multiple events will also take place on April 9 across Canada and in France to honour the 100th anniversary of the Battle of Vimy Ridge. Visit http://www.canada.ca/vimy-100 for more information on the history and legacy of the battle.

On April 8, the public can experience First World War re-enactor displays of infantry, artillery, cavalry, medicine, music and food as well as Great War related exhibits and films. Fort York will be open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. More information on VIMY 100 Toronto events is available at http://www.toronto.ca/fortevents.

VIMY 100 Toronto is part of the City’s Canada 150 TO Canada with Love program and is presented by the City in partnership with the Ontario150 program to celebrate the 150th anniversary of the Province of Ontario in 2017. Visit https://www.ontario.ca/150 more information.

As a National Historic Site, Fort York is a place for all Torontonians and Canadians to discover their common history and heritage. Since 1793, Fort York has been an important location militarily and is also known as Toronto’s founding landscape. Fort York National Historic Site is one of 10 historic sites operated by the City of Toronto. For more information visit http://www.toronto.ca/museums. Follow the City’s historic sites on Twitter at http://twitter.com/TOhistoricsites and Facebook at http://wwwfacebook.com/historictoronto.

Get information and updates about the TO Canada with Love program at http://www.toronto.ca/canada150 or on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/SpecialEventsTO, Twitter: http://twitter.com/SpecialEventsTO, Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/SpecialEventsTO and Snapchat: http://www.snapchat.com/add/specialeventsto. The program hashtag is #C150TO.

This news release is also available on the City of Toronto website at http://ow.ly/E97y30awqaq.

 

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Public meeting on Wed., March 29, 2017 at 7:00 pm regarding proposed construction of Estonian Centre at Tartu College

Update

In the event you are a reader of Eesti Elu, you will know that the proposed projects (described below) connected with the Estonian Centre and Tartu College are not without controversy. I have not been following the story closely, but have been reading articles in Eesti Elu that are of interest. Among other things, among the topics under discussion, at the Eesti Elu newspaper, are the organizing capabilities of the Annex Residents’ Association and the fate of a former Tibetan Buddhist temple building next door to Tartu College. I don’t know where to start, with regard to following the opposing views associated with a story that I’m aware has been evolving for many years.

[End]

 

A public meeting will take place at 7:00 pm on Wednesday, March 29, 2017 regarding the possibility of building an Estonian Centre at Tartu College in Toronto.

The building would be constructed where a parking lot is currently located near Tartu College at Bloor St. West and Madison Ave.

Image is from the link features at the page you are now reading.

Estonian Centre bird’s eye view from Madison Ave. (2017). Image is from the link featured at the page you are now reading. Click on image to enlarge it.

The meeting, which will take place at the Estonian House on Broadview Ave. just north of Danforth Ave., will discuss the proposed next step for the Estonian community in Toronto and Ontario.

For further information, please click here >

The text from the above-noted link reads:

March 6, 2017. The Boards of Directors of the Estonian House of Toronto, Estonian Credit Union, Estonian Foundation of Canada, and Tartu College, are pleased to share with you a positive development for a new Estonian community centre in the Greater Toronto Area.

Estonian Credit Union, Estonian Foundation of Canada, and Tartu College have together entered into a Letter of Intent (LOI) with Build Toronto, the City of Toronto corporation responsible for selling surplus municipal property, to buy the parking lot at 9 Madison Avenue.

This milestone is a huge accomplishment for our small community and presents for us a very real opportunity to contribute to the fabric of our city and the sustainability of our community.

Image is from the link features at the page you are now reading.

Estonian Centre view from Madison Ave. (2017). Image is from the link featured at the page you are now reading. Click on image to enlarge it.

We now have a window to build a signature community facility on Madison Avenue. This property is located between Tartu College to the south, and 11 Madison Avenue, owned by Estonian Credit Union, to the north.

Reaching this LOI agreement has required considerable negotiation, planning and work to ensure that our community had a viable option should development at 958 Broadview not be able to proceed.

This Madison opportunity is complex. It is only viable through the sale of the existing Estonian House property and using the proceeds to finance the new community and cultural centre.

As this new development proceeds, Estonian Credit Union, Estonian Foundation of Canada and Tartu College will support the Estonian House as it continues to serve the community until the new space is ready and firm transition plans are in place.

The Estonian House Board views the LOI as a step forward to a financially and logistically workable solution for a new community and cultural centre. We fully support the Madison opportunity and look forward to recommending this to our shareholders. We hope to make the transition to consolidate a smooth one.

During the coming months, the Estonian House Board, along with the other Boards of Directors, will inform and engage with the broader community and the Estonian House shareholders. We are grateful to all organizations and community groups who help keep the building looking fresh and useable as we will need our current space for a few years yet.

All four organizations are mindful that Toronto and the southern Ontario area is home to the largest number of Estonians living outside of Estonia. Our institutions allowed generations of Estonians to come together as a community, to celebrate our heritage and to share our culture with Canadians. We are committed to ensuring sustainable community space for our future generations.

Much work remains to be done. The Estonian House, Estonian Credit Union, Estonian Foundation of Canada, and Tartu College, are unanimous in their commitment to work together. Together, our community can secure a viable space to provide for our needs, to showcase our culture, and of which we can all be proud.

There will be a town hall meeting on March 29, 2017 at 7:00 pm in the Grand Hall at the Estonian House in Toronto, for the community to learn more about what this project needs to become a reality.

There are many questions to be resolved and we are committed to finding the solutions to make this work for the community. To see the vision: www.estoniancentre.ca

The Boards of Directors: Estonian House in Toronto Ltd; Estonian (Toronto) Credit Union Limited; Estonian Foundation of Canada; Tartu College

We have a window to build a signature Estonian Community Centre in Toronto. Join the discussion and help make the opportunity a reality.

Estonian Community Town Hall

March 29, 2017 Grand Hall at the Estonian House in Toronto

 

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Local Appeal Body – please refer to a link to a previous post

Part 3 of David Godley’s March 2017 update is concerned with the Local Appeal Board process. This topic is further addressed at a post entitled:

Messages from Manager, Projects Court Services, Office of Director, City of Toronto concerning Toronto Local Appeal Body

Rather than posting David’s previous messages regarding the Local Appeal Body, I am pleased to have the opportunity to direct your attention, at this point, to the above-noted link.

 

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Posted in Long Branch, Newsletter, Toronto | Leave a comment