Preserved Stories Blog

Nov. 30, 2017 Consultation on Laneway Housing, at Council Chambers, Toronto City Hall, was well attended and productive!

The turnout at the Nov. 30, 2017 Laneway Housing community meeting / consultation was very impressive; the photo shows just a small part of the audience in attendance. Jaan Pill photo

The turnout at the Nov. 30, 2017 Laneway Housing community meeting / consultation was very impressive; the photo shows just a small part of the audience in attendance. Jaan Pill photo

A recent post is entitled:

Consultation on Laneway Housing – Nov. 30, 2017; starts 6:30 pm, Council Chamber, City Hall, 100 Queen Street West

Although I do not live in a neighbourhood that has a lot of lanes, I am very keen to learn about Laneway Houses, Coach Houses, and Small Houses of all kinds.

I attended the Nov. 30, 2017 Consultation on Laneway Housing, referred to in the above-noted link and was very impressed with everything that I saw and heard. This appears to me to be a great consultation project. The views of residents – I get a clear sense of this from the meeting – will be heard; their views will be closely taken into consideration, I believe, based on what I saw at the Nov. 30, 2017 meeting.

As well, the slides and presentations and I imagine the gist of the Q & A part of the meeting will be featured at a website, devoted to the Consultation on Laneway Housing. The website will, as I understand, be up soon.

In the meantime, if you did not attend the meeting but would like to provide input, regarding your views about Laneway Housing, you can fill out the following comments sheet and send it to the postal address or email address included on the document:

laneway comment form003

Laneway Houses and Coach Houses

Among the many key things that I took away from the meeting was the distinction between Laneway Houses and Coach Houses. You need a Laneway in order to have a Laneway House. A Coach House is accessed through a driveway from the Main House; there is no Laneway involved.

I’m looking forward to visiting the City of Toronto “Changing Lames” website (or whatever it may be called).

I’m keen about Laneway Houses and Coach Houses because a next step in my life features a Writer’s Retreat in a city outside of Toronto; the Retreat that I have in mind is reminiscent of several concepts – including the Small House concept, the Laneway House concept, and the Coach House concept.

I’m also keen about Laneway Houses because the concept is creative and imaginative. It’s one way to add density to a neighbourhood without changing its character. In order for such a form of housing to work well, several issues must be effectively addressed. Fortunately, many cities in Canada and elsewhere have already begun to explore the options.

My sense from attending this evenings “Changing Lanes” community meeting is that the politicians, city staff, and residents who are involved with this initiative are off to a great start and will do an awesome job in finding solutions to the issues that are at play!

 

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As residents, neighbourhoods, and societies, we become what we imagine ourselves to be

The concept that we become what we imagine ourselves to be (or what we pretend ourselves to be) is from a quote in a book by Kurt Vonnegut, Jr.

The concept also brings to mind a line from William Blake, who speaks of people who became what they beheld. I came across both concepts somewhere around the 1960s.

Imagination – picturing things unseen in our minds – is a key element in storytelling – both in the fiction and in non-fiction genres of storytelling.

What follows is a continuation of a previous post entitled:

Public education about stuttering: Stuttering 101 – Globe and Mail, Dec. 9, 2010 (that is, twenty-ten)

Memes and self-talk

Self-talk concerns memes or stories we tell ourselves.

Assuming it has some relation to reality, positive self-talk is often helpful and may warrant celebration. Negative self-talk tends to be less than helpful, and can be addressed in three ways that I can think of, based on my own, anecdotal experience:

  1. Comparing notes with others
  2. Cognitive restructuring
  3. The practice of mindfulness

Like many people, I enjoy many forms of storytelling, and I like to ponder how stories are constructed.

Memes appear to be among the key features and foundations of storytelling, whatever form the telling of stories may take.

Memes and self-talk are interchangeable terms, in my experience.

A meme can be defined as an idea, behaviour, or style that spreads from person to person within a culture. I’m using a definition that I came across at an article highlighted at a previous post.

1) Comparing notes with others

The full meme that repeats itself, from time to time, in my own head is not precisely Those of Us Who Stutter, but rather, For Those of Us Who Stutter. The purpose of the “For” is not clear to me, but there it is.

I originally got started in volunteer work on behalf of people who stutter because every time I made a presentation to a large audience, in the first year after my attendance at an Edmonton speech clinic in July 1987, a particular refrain – namely,  You’re Not Supposed to Be Able to Do This – would run through my head.

To deal with the above-noted meme – a particular refrain, a form of negative self-talk, that would run through my head – I decided I needed to compare notes with other people who stutter.

In time, as I’ve explained elsewhere, I found a way to ensure that the meme, which had kept on repeating itself, and getting on my nerves, never bothered me again.

2) Cognitive restructuring

In the years after July 1987, I encountered plenty of self-talk that I could address systematically on my own, without a need to compare notes with anybody else. The meme that was associated with major presentations was in a separate, heavy-duty category, as compared to everyday negative self-talk, and for that reason, more work was required in order to address it.

The everyday self-talk could be readily addressed through a systematic form of cognitive restructuring. In this form of restructuring, I changed each of the negative instances of self-talk, and associated negative feelings, into alternative forms of self-talk.

At first, I needed to write down what the recurring negative meme was, before I could come up with a suitable alternative to it. In time, I learned to switch over, from the negative refrain to a positive one, without the requirement of writing anything down. It took some years of work, as I recall, to get to that point, in my cognitive-restructuring project.

3) Mindfulness

Another category of recursive thoughts, of a kind that can get in the way of a person’s equanimity, can be addressed in still another way, in my experience. Rather than focusing on such thoughts, I’ve learned to simply practise mindfulness. Mindfulness – the practice of awareness of the present moment – is a great technique for short-circuiting certain kinds of intrusive thoughts, I have learned.

When attention is turned to the here and now of the sensory input available to one’s senses, the strong presence of intrusive, recursive thoughts is dissipated, as a matter of course.

That Is So Impressive

These days, these many years later, another refrain that goes through my mind, and that I do not seek to alter, is the meme that says: That Is So Impressive.

That is a meme that I have no reason to change. It applies to things that I observe outside of myself. The Long Branch Neighbourhood Character Guidelines project comes to mind, by way of example; another example concerns the work of the Small Arms Society in Mississauga, and Inspiration Lakeview and Inspiration Port Credit; these are great examples. I have written many posts about them.

That Is So Impressive occasionally applies to work that I have done myself, and it also applies to first-rate books that I have been reading, such as the trilogy by the historian Richard J. Evans, concerned with the rise to power, and role in the Second World War, of Nazi Germany. I have been reading the latter trilogy ever since I began work on a project related to my late father’s photo album from the 1936 Berlin Summer Olympics.

Memes at the municipal level

In speaking about memes, I am speaking at an anecdotal level.

Memes operate at the individual level and at the level of groups, neighbourhoods, communities, municipalities, nation-states, failed nation-states, eras, epochs, and ages.

A municipal-level memes project, that is of interest to me, particularly at the conceptual level as it relates to storytelling and human agency, is the Story of M project, which I have written about previously. How this project is progressing, as time passes, is of interest to me.

The stories that we we tell ourselves – including memes based on visual imagery, stereotypes, political slogans, legal decisions within specified legal frameworks, advertisements, and memoirs – serve to express human agency.

Posture, gesture, gaze, and body language in general are also forms of storytelling.

Attending to, and ignoring (desisting from attending to), are forms of storytelling.

Privileging, editing, positioning, lighting, spotlighting, highlighting, and staging are in themselves forms of storytelling.

Human agency can be minimal, or it can be powerful

Some memes and stories are associated with rudimentary, lower-level forms of human agency.

Other memes and stories are associated with higher-level forms of human agency.

In my volunteer work, I have encountered a wide range of levels of human agency, among individuals and groups of people.

Human agency can give rise to outcomes that are helpful or unhelpful, constructive or destructive, as the case may be.

Whatever meaning or value we ascribe to an outcome, that is, is determined by the frame of reference that we bring to our perception, of the outcome in question.

With regard to frames, I find it useful to distinguish between 1) frames that are based on evidence, and 2) frames that depend on opinions and feelings and anything else, other than evidence.

Some frames give rise to destructive realities.

That is evident, by way of example, in a trilogy of exemplary, evidence-based studies by Richard J. Evans which describes the rise and fall of Nazi Germany.

Sometimes widely held memes are changed because people get tired of them. At other times, as in the case of the fall of Nazi Germany, reality intrudes, and the memes that are based upon non-evidence get pushed aside by the rush of real-world events.

With regard to Richard J. Evans, a historian whose work is strongly evidence-based, and who makes effective use of narrative structures in outlining key points, two previous posts include:

My father’s photo album from 1936 Berlin Olympics drives my interest in reading Richard J. Evans’ trilogy about Nazi Germany, and

Narrative helps us understand Germany in the 1930s (Richard J. Evans, 2004)

 

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Posted in Autobiography Stories - J. Pill, Commentary, Language usage, Newsletter, Story management | 1 Comment

Public education about stuttering: Stuttering 101 – Globe and Mail, Dec. 9, 2010 (that is, twenty-ten)

For many years, I was focused on volunteer work related to public education about stuttering, a speech condition that I had the good fortune to successfully deal with, many years ago – in July 1987, to be exact, when I attended a three-week speech clinic in Edmonton.

The three weeks that I spent in Edmonton were followed up with several years of focused, disciplined, daily practice aimed at consolidation and maintenance of my newly-aquired fluency skills.

In the past 10 or 15 years, I have to a large extent left volunteer work on behalf of people who stutter behind.

Yet, every once in a while, a phrase runs through my head.

That phrase is: “Those of Us Who Stutter.”

That phrase will stay with me forever.

I often used that phrase in my media relations work, on behalf of people who stutter, and in discussions – over many, many years – with other people who stutter.

From time to time, I’m still involved with such discussions.

Radio interview with CSA member Daniele Rossi

Recently, I received a message from Daniele Rossi, who as a volunteer remains active with the Canadian Stuttering Association (CSA).

He shared some information about an upcoming radio interview.

On Nov. 27, 2017, Jaan Pill wrote:

I received your email about: (Public outreach) Radio interview on CJAM.

It’s great that you have the opportunity to take part in this interview. You will do a great job.

By way of offering some ideas for reflection, as you prepare for the interview, below is the outcome of an interview I did with Jane Taber of the Globe and Mail for a piece entitled “Stuttering 101” published on Dec. 9, 2010 as the following link notes:

Stuttering 101

*

Stuttering 101

JANE TABER

DECEMBER 9, 2010

Stuttering etiquette: Maintain eye contact with a stutterer when he or she is stuck on a word, says Canadian Stuttering Association co-founder Jaan Pill. Looking away, he says, “communicates embarrassment” and telegraphs that “the person speaking is not entirely part of the human race.” Let the person finish; do not try to finish the sentence yourself.

Causes: Stuttering is a neurological disorder; it is not psychological.

337,000: The number of people who stutter in Canada.

[Note from Jaan: The number is higher now; it’s one percent of whatever the population of Canada is now.]

One in 20: The proportion of people who stutter in childhood when learning to speak; the majority of them are boys. Most outgrow it, leaving one in 100 adults as stutterers.

Famous stutterers: King George VI, Aesop, Charles Darwin, Winston Churchill, Rowan Atkinson (Mr. Bean), Marilyn Monroe.

Jane Taber

 

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Swearing pulls on the emotional centres of the brain – I Swear (2017) by Emma Byrne

A Nov. 24, 2017 CBC article is entitled – and I swear this is true – “‘Swearing is Good for You’: The evolutionary advantages of f-bombs.”

The article refers to a book by Emma Byrne entitled:

I Swear: The Surprising Science of Our Dirtiest Words (2017)

I swear. Sometimes. Especially when I’m in either the role of a pedestrian or a driver.

Over the years, I’ve learned to swear in Estonian, French, and English.

A friend of mine, who is 98, says that kids learn their full supply of swear words at a young age, in the schoolyard. She remarks that it’s remarkable, that you don’t need a teacher to help you learn all the swear words, that everybody knows.

 

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SvN’s Long Branch Character Guidelines was unanimously approved by [Etobicoke York Community] Council last week – Nov. 24, 2017 Novae Res Urbis article (reposted by SvN)

A Nov. 24, 2017 Novae Res Urbis article has been reposted on Nov. 27, 2017 at the SvN website; the article is entitled:

SvN’s Long Branch Character Guidelines was unanimously approved by Council last week

That is, it was approved by the Etobicoke York Community Council at its meeting on Nov. 14, 2017.

Related posts include:

Long Branch Character Guidelines final staff report passed unanimously by Etobicoke York Community Council

Long Branch Neighbourhood Character Guidelines – Text of Final Report, Oct. 26, 2017

 

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New Long Branch Neighbourhood Association aims to enhance community: Nov. 14, 2017 Etobicoke Guardian article

A Nov. 14, 2017 Etobicoke Guardian article by Cynthia Reason is entitled: “New Long Branch Neighbourhood Association aims to enhance community: Group vows to tackle issues, organize celebrations.”

Good article!

 

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Left-hand turns from Lake Shore to Long Branch Ave. and to Thirty Seventh present characteristic hazards

The sign is posted near the corner of Forty First St. and James St. in Long Branch. The view is toward Marie Curtis Park looking west along James St. Jaan Pill photo

The sign is posted near the corner of Forty First St. and James St. in Long Branch. The view is toward Marie Curtis Park looking west along James St. Jaan Pill photo

A previous post is entitled:

Beware when trying to cross east to west on the north side of Lake Shore Blvd. West at Park Lawn in Humber Bay Shores

Here are some additional notes, that have occurred to me:

It’s been noted that a left-turn light at Lake Shore and Long Branch would be beneficial. The same applies at Thirty Seventh and Lake Shore.

When driving west on Lake Shore, and seeking to make a left turn to go south on Thirty Seventh, there’s a particular visual scenario at play.

The TTC traffic island on Lake Shore, that a driver is looking toward when contemplating a left-hand turn from Lake Shore to Thirty Seventh, partially obscures traffic travelling west to east on the lane next to the south sidewalk on Lake Shore.

In a sense, when making such a turn, a driver may be “flying blind.” You may not know, until you have begun the turn, that an opposing car is approaching you at high speed.

I recall this, as I remember seeing a situation where a driver made a turn from Lake Shore to go on to Thirty Seventh. As the turn was made, just as the light was turning red, a car was speeding west to east on the sidewalk-side lane on Lake Shore, with the aim of getting through before the light turned red.

The car turning south made it through the turn within a split second of the eastbound car passing through the intersection. The southbound car got through just in time, before the eastbound car sped through the same intersection. The cars missed colliding by about a metre.

I was, at that instance, as I recall, standing on the westernmost end of the TTC traffic island, having taken some photos looking south toward the Rexall building, which is the site of the former Eastwood Park Hotel. From that vantage point looking east, I had a clear view of the near-collision.

I reconstructed, in my mind, what the dynamics were, in this particular situation. Both drivers were keen to get through the light before it turned red. In their rush, neither was fully aware of the other driver.

As a rule, I avoid left-hand turns on Lake Shore in such circumstances.

 

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Beware when trying to cross east to west on the north side of Lake Shore Blvd. West at Park Lawn in Humber Bay Shores

The sign is posted near the corner of Forty First St. and James St. in Long Branch. The view is toward Marie Curtis Park looking west along James St. Jaan Pill photo

The sign is posted near the corner of Forty First St. and James St. in Long Branch. The view is toward Marie Curtis Park looking west along James St. Jaan Pill photo

I have shared the following message (and the photo on the right) with the Long Branch Neighbourhood Watch Facebook page.

I share it with readers of the Preserved Stories website as well, in the event there may be one or two site visitors who might be interested.

My Facebook comment:

I am pleased there is a measure of interest in the topic of survival on the streets – whether in the role of pedestrian, driver, or cyclist.

My comment concerns Humber Bay Shores. This is a ways east of Long Branch. Thus if you do not wish to hear about topics related to other parts of Toronto, stop reading now.

Anyway, as I was saying (if you are still reading), I recently went to Park Lawn Road and Lake Shore Blvd. West to take some photos of the former Mr. Christie’s site. I crossed (in my role as a pedestrian) at the corner of Lake Shore Blvd. West and Park Lawn, on the north side. That crossing went well.

On the way back from my photo session, I stopped at the northeast corner of Park Lawn and Lake Shore. I was planning to cross Park Lawn walking west at the stop light. The light turned green. The little white pedestrian logo appeared across the street.

I was about to step forward and proceed across the street. However, I make it a habit to look to my left, under such conditions. Just as I looked to my left, a car car barrelling around the corner, heading from the east along Lake Shore and made the turn at Park Lawn without a second thought.

The fact that a pedestrian was about to cross the street was as far from the consciousness of the driver, as the recent rise in the price of coffee. The driver would not have cared less. Had I not stopped to ponder, whether or not the way was clear for me to cross, I would not be writing this note today. I would be one more statistic, another pedestrian wiped out at a crossing in Toronto.

Subsequent post

A subsequent post is entitled:

Left-hand turns from Lake Shore to Long Branch Ave. and to Thirty Seventh present characteristic hazards

 

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The Mississauga meme has been: “No Tall Towers on the Lake” – will the meme survive?

This post concerns a well-attended community meeting, featuring many lively discussions, held at the Waterside Inn in Port Credit on Nov. 21, 2017.

The meeting concerned the next steps for redevelopment of a stretch of Port Credit waterfront.

This post also concerns memes.

A meme can be defined as an idea, behaviour, or style that spreads from person to person within a culture. I’m using a definition that I came across at an article highlighted at a previous post dated Jan. 13, 2014.

The community meeting on Nov. 21, 2017 in Port Credit was concerned with redevelopment of the former Imperial Oil Lands at 70 Mississauga Road South.

As is noted at the City of Mississauga website, West Village Partners, the new owners of 70 Mississauga Road South, have prepared a draft master plan for the site.

June 8, 2017 community meeting

Port Credit Inspiration hosted a community meeting on June 8, 2017 where West Village Partners presented a version of a draft master plan.

Nov. 21, 2017 Port Credit community meeting concerned with development of former Imperial Oil Lands at 70 Mississauga Road South. Jaan Pill photo

Nov. 21, 2017 Port Credit community meeting concerned with development of former Imperial Oil Lands at 70 Mississauga Road South. Jaan Pill photo

I attended the above-noted meeting, as well as the subsequent community meeting that was held, regarding a draft master plan, on Nov. 21, 2017.

I recorded parts of both meetings and a long way down the road, I may get around to writing about the ongoing planning process in more detail.

At this point, I’d like to share some quick points.

Good turnout

First, I was very impressed with the large turnout, at both the June 8, 2017 and Nov. 21, 2017 meetings.

The level of involvement, by the local Port Credit community, is most impressive.

I also have the sense that in the ongoing community consultation as it relates to Inspiration Port Credit and Inspiration Lakeview, the alignment between rhetoric and reality, with regard to community consultation, is very close.

That stands in contrast to other communities where, in my experience, rhetoric and reality are at times very far apart, at the end of the day when outcomes can be assessed.

Nov. 21, 2017 Port Credit community meeting concerned with development of former Imperial Oil Lands at 70 Mississauga Road South. Jaan Pill photo

Nov. 21, 2017 Port Credit community meeting concerned redevelopment of former Imperial Oil Lands at 70 Mississauga Road South. Jaan Pill photo

The Mississauga meme has been: “No Tall Towers on the Lake” – will the meme survive the passage of the years?

Secondly, it has occurred to me that much of life, including political life, involves memes.

A standard meme in Mississauga, which I have shared at previous posts, is that politicians such as Ward 1 Councillor Jim Tovey and former mayor Hazel McCallion have often remarked that it’s characteristic of Toronto that you see a wall of tall condos facing Lake Ontario.

The corollary is that, in Mississauga, there are no tall towers on the Mississauga waterfront – and no plans to so place them, in the future.

The meme has, as I understand, become a point of pride among many residents of Mississauga.

As it happened, however, the June 8, 2017 meeting included a proposal to situate at least one tall condo at the waterfront.

That detail, at the meeting, really caught my attention.

My first thought was, “How could this be?”

I wondered, “How will the previous, great meme be retired from service? What alternative meme will be launched, in order to differentiate the City of Mississauga from the City of Toronto?

At the Nov. 21, 2017 meeting, one of the slides showed what the community consultations, in the prior years of community meetings, had arrived at, with regard to the proposed built form for the former former Imperial Oil Lands at 70 Mississauga Road South.

What you saw in the original concept was a cluster of medium-rise buildings located in the central area of a stretch of land extending from Lake Ontario to Lakeshore Road West. By the water, what you saw was a few slightly taller – but not overwhelmingly tall – buildings.

The concept presented by West Village Partners on Nov. 21, 2017, in contrast, had low-rise buildings in the centre of the stretch of land and a grouping of high-rise buildings (with one building at 26 storeys) very close to the lake.

That is to say, and these are my words, “Bye, Bye, Mississauga Meme.”

Nov. 21, 2017 Port Credit community meeting convened with

Nov. 21, 2017 Port Credit community meeting concerned with development of former Imperial Oil Lands at 70 Mississauga Road South. The image at the bottom of the slide shows a cluster of tall buildings next to the shoreline of Lake Ontario. Jaan Pill photo. Click on the image to enlarge it; click again to enlarge it further.

Not all tables summed up what they had discussed

For the past 40 years, I’ve been attending meetings, where people break into small groups, discuss a given topic for a specified period of time, and then arrange for a spokesperson from each group to report back to the group as a whole.

At the Nov. 21, 2017 meeting, I observed something that I have not observed before.

A number of tables declined to make a report to the group as a whole.

I wondered how this could happen.

I would speculate that the turnout at the meeting was so large, that some people simply did not wish to speak.

Or it may have been the case that at the start of the reports from the tables, it had been announced that the sharing of discussion topic, from each table, was optional.

I would not know. I missed the start of the reports from the tables, as I went for a walk during the 45 minutes that the table discussions proceeded.

At any rate, the written comments in the workbooks, which are part of the consultation process, are the key sources of input.

That is to say, if a table did not speak out, to share their conclusions with the meeting at large, their input would still be factored in, by way of written comments.

I also noted that some of the speakers appeared to be promoting their own personal views, in contrast to focusing on a report summing up all of the views from a given table.

I recall, from a conference I attended years ago (in Banff, Alberta in August 1991), that one way to counter this tendency is for a facilitator to note, at the beginning of a discussion session, that sometimes it’s a great idea for a table to choose, as a spokesperson, a speaker who is not the most vocal person in the group.

In that way, you get a report from the table, that is possibly bound to be more broadly representative, of the group than the report by the most vocal person. That’s because the most vocal person is likely to focus on what she or he wants to get across, rather than what the group wants to get across.

That’s just a note in passing. The point is, that what a facilitator says, at the start of a table discussion, can have a huge impact on how the process is structured.

Another note in passing is that, in many table discussions, that I’ve attended, a planner or similar professional acts as a resource or facilitator, at each table. As a last resort, I think it would be a great idea if such a person were to act as a spokesperson, for a given table – especially in the case of a super large meeting, where no-one else at a table wants to engage in the act of public speaking.

Comments from the tables

The sound system at the meeting room at the Wayside Inn worked well. About the only problem was that, when the portable mic was held too close to a speaker’s mouth, there was a loss of intelligibility due to sound distortion. However, people figured out pretty quickly what the ideal distance from the mic was.

What follows is the first part  of an overview of the reports, based on my notes.

I may have missed a report or two, at the very beginning of the reports. As well as taking notes, I also recorded the speakers, but do not have time to check the recordings, as I write this overview.

At the point where I came in, a spokesperson was saying that, in her opinion, public parks should not have BBQs. She also said it was great to have taller buildings closer to the lake. They have, she noted, great views of the lake. She also said she would refer not to have stacked townhouses in the middle of the land, and added that schools for children would need to be addressed.

As I understand, traffic issues were not to be discussed, at this meeting

A second spokesperson said, “Everybody at our table wanted to talk about traffic issues,” despite the fact that the instructions, at the onset of the discussion, specified that traffic issues were not to be discussed.

The speaker also said that the table in question felt the Port Credit Heritage Conservation District should be isolated from the new development.

As well, he expressed the hope that the Waterfront Trail would be retained, as it serves a useful purpose, in particular for Cranberry Cove residents.

The spokesperson also said there was a concern about the number of condos that were mingled in the proposed campus area, but he added that the campus concept is, in itself, a good one.

Next speaker was not happy

The next speaker said he was not happy with the West Village Partners proposal.

He said: No Inspiration. No Vision.

He said the land in question is too valuable to throw away on knee-jerk design. He recommended an international design competition to design a park.

He said a ratio of 40 percent park and 60 percent residential would be good, rather than what was currently proposed.

He also objected to underground parking, and suggested that there be a Metrolinx link to the development.

Dislike of high towers

The next speaker spoke of his table’s dislike of the high towers in the proposal, as well as their proximity to the lake, and to the big move away from the original plan.

[That’s a paraphrase of what was said.]

He added it would be important for Non-West Village residents to feel welcome at the development. He spoke in support of integration “so we don’t have segregated neighbourhoods.”

He also referred, if I have this correct from my notes, to the scarcity of park land in the proposal.

To be continued

(It will take a while.)

 

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Consultation on Laneway Housing – Nov. 30, 2017; starts 6:30 pm, Council Chamber, City Hall, 100 Queen Street West

I am pleased to share the following information from the website of City of Toronto Wad 6 Trinity-Spadina Councillor Joe Cressy

Laneway Suites- November 30 Community Consultation

Tucked away near the places we live, work and play are spaces that can often be forgotten.  Places that we can, together, creatively transform to help us enhance our vibrant neighbourhoods – laneways.  Our laneways offer opportunities at every turn.

Recently, the non-profit organization Lanescape and Evergreen prepared a report on laneway housing suites, and how they could be implemented in the Toronto and East York District. I agree that laneway housing presents an exciting opportunity to address our city’s affordable housing crisis. Now, we must ensure we are working together to develop a framework for laneway suites, and other laneway activations, together.

They presented their report to Toronto and East York Community Council, where we requested a formal study and review be conducted by our own Planning staff. City staff will now take the report that was done by the non-profits, and complete a formal study, including consultation with the public, to produce guidelines and criteria for how we can implement laneway housing. Our laneways are a tremendous untapped resource and they should and need to be activated. The question is what type of activation and on what laneway?

The City is holding a community consultation meeting at City Hall where you can learn more about the study, ask questions, and share your comments.

Meeting details:

Date: November 30, 2017
Time: 6:30 PM – 9:00 p.m.
Location: Council Chamber, City Hall, 100 Queen Street West

The consultation will begin with a presentation at 6:30 p.m. followed by an open house at 7:15pm where comments and questions can be provided directly to City Staff from a variety of City Divisions. Download the full meeting notice here.

 

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