Massive North York tree has been silent witness to regional history – May 16, 2015 Toronto Star

A May 16, 2015 Toronto Star article is entitled: “Massive North York tree has been silent witness to regional history: Amateur historian fears majestic red oak – possibly dating back to 1765 – could be chopped down by new homeowner.”

The opening paragraphs read:

Edith George stands next to the trunk the grand red oak of Weston in 2006. Source: May 16, 2015 Toronto Star article, referred to at the post you are now reading.

Edith George stands next to the trunk the grand red oak of Weston in 2006. Source: May 16, 2015 Toronto Star article, referred to at the post you are now reading.

“She wrote emails, left messages and when she finally got me, burst into tears over the phone, overwrought about this particular red oak.

“Now, I’m a tree-hugger. But this woman is a tree-nut, I thought.

“Until, I stepped under its massive, ancient outstretched limbs.

“This is not a tree. It’s a cathedral.

“Its gnarled trunk stretches 24 metres — so high, my neck crimped. Its girthy midsection would take four people to encircle — almost five metres around.

“Touching its rutted bark, I felt like I had slipped into a black-and-white pioneer photo — the ones capturing lumberjacks with floppy hats and crosscut hand saws.

“This red oak is even older than that, though. Three arborists estimated it was born around 1765 — almost 100 years before confederation.”

[End of excerpt]

 

2 replies
  1. Edith George
    Edith George says:

    Since the amalgamation of the City of Toronto in 1999, there has not been one tree that has been designated a heritage tree. Maybe this great red oak will be the first with more to follow.

    We will have to wait and see.

    Edith George

    Reply
  2. Jaan Pill
    Jaan Pill says:

    Good to read your message, Edith. I’ve shared your message with Ian Bruce of Bruce Tree and Tom Millar of the Save The Bala Falls project in Muskoka cottage country.

    I’ll be posting a video, as soon as it’s edited, in which Tom Millar speaks of the concept of the preservation of heritage landscapes, with a focus on the efforts to save Bala Falls:

    http://www.SaveTheBalaFalls.com

    Heritage landscapes and heritage trees: Part of our heritage, well worth preserving.

    Reply

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