‘Top 25 Hottest Articles’ at ScienceDirect at the Journal of Fluency Disorders

The ‘Top 25 Hottest Articles’ at ScienceDirect at the Journal of Fluency Disorders can be accessed here.

I receive this list by email, a few times a year, because I have signed up some years ago to be on the subscription list.

This kind of information is of interest in particular for people who stutter, a population which amounts to one percent of the adult population, in countries around the world, and about five percent of young children, during early childhood when we are learning to speak.

I have had the good fortune to achieve good control over my own stuttering, in 1987. I have written about this change of fortune, this change in my life, elsewhere. I’ve also made a lot of presentations on this topic and have an online video about the topic as well.

As I say, stuttering is something that affects just a small part of the population. It has affected me. After I attended a speech therapy clinic in Edmonton in 1987 – the Institute for Stuttering Treatment and Research (ISTAR for short) – the direction of my life changed dramatically. What a delightful experience that has been.

After several years of daily practice of my newly acquired fluency skills, and regular analysis of recordings of my everyday speech, to ensure that I was applying my skills correctly, I achieved success in the consolidation of my control over my stuttering. In many cases, people that I talk with every day would not have a clue that there was a time in my life when I could not get out any words at all.

For twenty-five years, I did volunteer work on behalf of people who stutter. I was active in community self-organizing, on behalf of people who stutter, at the local, national, and international levels. During those years I was involved in the founding of several associations as well as a role as a media relations person speaking on behalf of people who stutter, and arranging for media interviews in which other people who stutter shared their experiences with non-stuttering audiences.

I’m very pleased that other people, a younger generation, are involved with the volunteer work that I was intensively involved with for twenty-five years. I have moved on to other forms of volunteer work, and all of the skills that I learned, during those previous years of community self-organization projects, are now applied to other forms of volunteer work. It’s wonderful to touch base, from time, to time, with research about stuttering. In the course of dealing with my own stuttering, I learned of the value of evidence-based practice, and of working with evidence in a systematic way. I am not sure that I would have learned about the value of evidence in any other way, under other circumstances. Maybe I would have, maybe not. At any rate, I have.

Materiality

A previous post from some time back is entitled: What is the relation between culture and materiality?

I mention the post because materiality, which is related to income and to political agency, in my understanding of the term, is something that I have experienced in a Before and After sense.

Another way to speak of materiality is to speak of material reality or material realities.

My visit to Edmonton in 1987 changed the trajectory of my life. My relationship to materiality changed. People who are disabled often have lower incomes than non-disabled persons. That’s what the statistics indicate. I have traveled through many levels of disability and ability, and in the process I have traveled through many levels of materiality, by which I refer to income and a sense of political agency. By political agency I refer to the capacity to make things happen, in the society in which a person’s life is embedded.

I recall when I was involved with issues related to disabilities that at time people would say, “As people get older, they will sometimes inevitably become acquainted with the experience of disability.” So it is. Welcome to the club. In this area, as in others, we have a lot to learn from each other.

Enough of my digression about the meaning of life. In the rest of the post, I will list the ‘Top 25 Hottest Articles’ at ScienceDirect at the Journal of Fluency Disorders.

To access the link, that is associated with each article, click here.

‘Top 25’

1) Epidemiology of stuttering: 21st century advances • Article
Journal of Fluency Disorders, Pages 66-87
Yairi, Ehud; Ambrose, Nicoline

2) Anxiety of children and adolescents who stutter: A review • Review article
Journal of Fluency Disorders, Volume 40, Pages 22-34
Smith, K.A.; Iverach, L.; O’Brian, S.; Kefalianos, E.; Reilly, S.

3) Stuttering in relation to anxiety, temperament, and personality: Review and analysis with focus on causality • Review article
Journal of Fluency Disorders, Volume 40, Pages 5-21
Alm, P.A.

4) Theory and therapy in stuttering: A complex relationship • Article
Journal of Fluency Disorders, Volume 37, Issue 4, Pages 225-233
Packman, Ann
Cited by Scopus (3)

5) Cognitive behavior therapy for adults who stutter: A tutorial for speech-language pathologists • Article
Journal of Fluency Disorders, Volume 34, Issue 3, Pages 187-200
Menzies, Ross G.; Onslow, Mark; Packman, Ann; O’Brian, Sue
Cited by Scopus (28)

6) The social and communication impact of stuttering on adolescents and their families • Article
Journal of Fluency Disorders
Erickson, Shane; Block, Susan

7) Bullying in children who stutter: Speech-language pathologists’ perceptions and intervention strategies • Article
Journal of Fluency Disorders, Volume 35, Issue 2, Pages 92-109
Blood, Gordon W.; Boyle, Michael P.; Blood, Ingrid M.; Nalesnik, Gina R.
Cited by Scopus (21)

8) The impact of stuttering on the quality of life in adults who stutter • Article
Journal of Fluency Disorders, Volume 34, Issue 2, Pages 61-71
Craig, Ashley; Blumgart, Elaine; Tran, Yvonne
Cited by Scopus (77)

9) Experimental treatment of early stuttering: A preliminary study • Article
Journal of Fluency Disorders, Volume 30, Issue 3, Pages 189-199
Franken, Marie-Christine J.; Schalk, Carine J. Kielstra-Van der; Boelens, Harrie
Cited by Scopus (37)

10) An experimental investigation of the impact of the Lidcombe Program on early stuttering • Article
Journal of Fluency Disorders, Volume 27, Issue 3, Pages 203-214
Harris, Vanessa; Onslow, Mark; Packman, Ann; Harrison, Elisabeth; Menzies, Ross
Cited by Scopus (39)

11) Overall Assessment of the Speaker’s Experience of Stuttering (OASES): Documenting multiple outcomes in stuttering treatment • Article
Journal of Fluency Disorders, Volume 31, Issue 2, Pages 90-115
Yaruss, J. Scott; Quesal, Robert W.
Cited by Scopus (85)

12) Mindfulness training in stuttering therapy: A tutorial for speech-language pathologists • Article
Journal of Fluency Disorders, Volume 36, Issue 2, Pages 122-129
Boyle, Michael P.
Cited by Scopus (8)

13) Assessing quality of life in stuttering treatment outcomes research • Article
Journal of Fluency Disorders, Volume 35, Issue 3, Pages 190-202
Yaruss, J. Scott
Cited by Scopus (37)

14) The neurological underpinnings of cluttering: Some initial findings • Article
Journal of Fluency Disorders, Volume 43, Pages 1-16
Ward, D.; Connally, E.L.; Pliatsikas, C.; Bretherton-Furness, J.; Watkins, K.E.

15) Evidence-based practice in stuttering: Some questions to consider • Article
Journal of Fluency Disorders, Volume 30, Issue 3, Pages 163-188
Bernstein Ratner, Nan
Cited by Scopus (30)

16) Social anxiety in stuttering: measuring negative social expectancies • Article
Journal of Fluency Disorders, Volume 29, Issue 3, Pages 201-212
Messenger, Michelle; Onslow, Mark; Packman, Ann; Menzies, Ross
Cited by Scopus (67)

17) The effectiveness of stuttering treatments in Germany • Article
Journal of Fluency Disorders, Volume 39, Pages 1-11
Euler, H.A.; Lange, B.P.; Schroeder, S.; Neumann, K.

18) Palin Parent Child Interaction and the Lidcombe Program: Clarifying some issues • Review article
Journal of Fluency Disorders, Volume 37, Issue 1, Pages 1-8
Onslow, Mark; Millard, Sharon
Cited by Scopus (3)

19) The long term effectiveness of intensive stuttering therapy: A mixed methods study • Article
Journal of Fluency Disorders, Volume 37, Issue 3, Pages 164-178
Irani, Farzan; Gabel, Rodney; Daniels, Derek; Hughes, Stephanie
Cited by Scopus (3)

20) The relationship between anxiety and stuttering: a multidimensional approach • Article
Journal of Fluency Disorders, Volume 29, Issue 2, Pages 135-148
Ezrati-Vinacour, Ruth; Levin, Iris
Cited by Scopus (54)

21) Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for adults who stutter: Psychosocial adjustment and speech fluency • Article
Journal of Fluency Disorders, Volume 37, Issue 4, Pages 289-299
Beilby, Janet M.; Byrnes, Michelle L.; Yaruss, J. Scott
Cited by Scopus (6)

22) Health-related quality of life of preschool children who stutter • Article
Journal of Fluency Disorders, Volume 42, Pages 1-12
de Sonneville-Koedoot, C.; Stolk, E.A.; Raat, H.; Bouwmans-Frijters, C.; Franken, M.C.

23) Preschool speech articulation and nonword repetition abilities may help predict eventual recovery or persistence of stuttering • Article
Journal of Fluency Disorders, Volume 41, Pages 32-46
Spencer, C.; Weber-Fox, C.

24) The impact of stuttering on employment opportunities and job performance • Article
Journal of Fluency Disorders, Volume 29, Issue 4, Pages 255-273
Klein, Joseph F.; Hood, Stephen B.
Cited by Scopus (51)

25) Childhood stuttering • Article
Journal of Fluency Disorders, Volume 25, Issue 1, Pages 47-57
Månsson, Hans
Cited by Scopus (94)

 

1 reply
  1. Jaan Pill
    Jaan Pill says:

    Every person has value. Whatever their material circumstances may be.

    My life has been enriched, through experiencing a unique – or somewhat unique – form of reality tourism.

    Different people will react in different ways to such a form of reality tourism. I have seen things, I have experienced things, in terms of Before and After 1987 (in my case), that I would otherwise not have seen, and not have experienced.

    Over these years, it has been the same person experiencing life from day to day. The same eyes looking out at the world.

    Yet the world has changed. That is the essence of reality tourism, as I understand the concept. We travel from place place. At each tourism destination, the world appears different. My world has changed, because people respond to me in a different way, and I have a vastly stronger sense of agency. That’s the essence of the Before and After scenario, that has been my unique experience. That’s been my experience of reality tourism.

    The experience I refer to is the learning of fluency as a second language, at the age of 41. The experience has also involved the steps, over a period of several years after 1987, that I embarked upon, in a systematic way, to ensure that I managed to consolidate the application of the skills in my day to day life.

    What I’ve experienced is unique, up to a point, but not entirely unique; others have also experienced all manner of changes for the better in their lives, and have in each case arrived at their own understanding of what such changes signify.

    I received help, that made a difference, at the age of 41, after many false starts earlier in my life. I am very pleased to know that the field of stuttering treatment has evolved tremendously over the past fifty years. I have kept track with those changes. These days, help is available even in early childhood. It remains the case, as well, that even at the age of 41, a person can experience a Before and After phase in life, depending upon the circumstances. Each of us, whatever circumstances of life we may find ourselves embedded in, has the opportunity to benefit from what other people have learned.

    Reply

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