Preserved Stories Blog


Places to see in Toronto and Mississauga if you’re attending MCHS 2015 (Part 1)

View of Lake Ontario from Marie Curtis Park, about February 2015. Jaan pill photo

View of Lake Ontario from Marie Curtis Park, about February 2015. Jaan Pill photo

If you are visiting Toronto for the MCHS 2015 Reunion, which takes place on October 17, 2015 at Old Mill Toronto, there are many places to see during your visit.

The purpose of this post is to provide a brief overview of some places that come to mind for me, as a member of the MCHS ’60s Reunion organizing team.

With time being short, I’m preparing this post using Dragon Dictate on a Mac.

Marie Curtis Park

When time permits, I will add photos that will help to illustrate texts such as this one.

For now, I will say a few things about places that you can travel to if you are staying at the Stay Inn, where we have a special rates of around $100 a night for the reunion Attendees.

If you drive south from Stay Inn, along Brown’s Line,  you will come to Lakeshore Blvd. West. From there, you travel west to Forty First Street. You travel south along Forty First Street and you will be at Marie Curtis Park.  At Mary Curtis Park, you can cross a footbridge over Etobicoke Creek and from that point easily make your way to a beach at the shoreline of Lake Ontario.

The photograph at the top of the page you are now reading shows you the shoreline as it appears in the winter when ice formations appear on the lake, under suitable conditions. That is, it has to be very cold over a period of time, and then you see some great ice formations.

Click here for previous posts about Marie Curtis Park >

Click here for previous posts about Etobicoke Creek >

Long Branch Rifle Range and Small Arms Building

Detail from utility cover at parking lot to the south of the Small Arms Building near Dixie Road and Lakeshore Road East in Mississauga. Jaan Pill photo

Detail from utility cover at parking lot to the south of the Small Arms Building near Dixie Road and Lakeshore Road East in Mississauga. Jaan Pill photo

If you walk west along the trail, that you will see in the part of Marie Curtis Park that is located west of Etobicoke Creek, the trail – called the Waterfront Trail – will take you north through the Long Branch Rifle Range.

Click here for previous posts about the  Long Branch Rifle Range >

If you continue to walk north along the Waterfront Trail, you will be walking through Mississauga. On the shoreline of Lake Ontario, the border between the City of Mississauga and the City of Toronto is at a point to the east of Applewood Creek. North of Lakeshore Road East, on the other hand, Etobicoke Creek marks the border between the two cities.

M4 Sherman tank on display across from Small Arms Building, at Dixie Road and Lakeshore Road East in Mississauga, at September 28, 2013 Small Arms Doors Open event. Jaan Pill photo

M4 Sherman tank on display across from Small Arms Building, at Dixie Road and Lakeshore Road East in Mississauga, at September 28, 2013 Small Arms Doors Open event. Jaan Pill photo

The road that you will end up at, as you walk north along the trail, is called Lakeshore Rd., East.  If you walk not very far to the west of along the roadway, you will soon come to a plaque that shows where Canada’s First Aerodrome was located.

Click here for previous posts about Long Branch Aerodrome >

PANORAMA AIR CREW 1917. Photo by Bob Lansdale of the original photo

The photo (above) is from a post entitled:

“Y” Squadron air crew, Long Branch, May 27, 1917

Click on images at this page to enlarge them. Click again to enlarge them further.

If you now walk east along Lakeshore Road East, you will come to Dixie Road. At that location, set back a short ways to the south from Lakeshore Road East, you will come to the Small Arms Building.

Click here to access previous posts about Small Arms Building >

Cloverdale Mall, Sherway Gardens, Six Points Interchange

Spaghetti Junction - The Farewell Tour. The walk leaves Dundas Street West and moves toward the Six Points Interchange construction site. Jaan Pill photo

Spaghetti Junction – The Farewell Tour. In the photo, the May 2, 2015 Jane’s Walk walk leaves Dundas Street West and moves toward the Six Points Interchange construction site. Jaan Pill photo

In future posts, I will talk about  additional points of interest, to the west, north and east of Stay Inn. Sherway Gardens, located to the west of the hotel, is within walking distance of Stay Inn. Cloverdale Mall is a short drive to the north of Stay Inn, and the Six Points Interchange is located some ways to the east of Cloverdale Mall on the way to Old Mill Toronto.

Each of these locations are great places to visit. Cloverdale Mall stands in strong contrast, in terms of its scale and I would say also in its approach to life, when you compare it to Sherway Gardens. If you have time, it’s well worth your while to visit both of these great shopping destinations.

Over the years, I’ve been involved in organizing many Jane’s Walks in the community’s that I like to hang around.  This year we had James Walks in New Toronto, at the Six Points Interchange, and at the Small Arms Building in Mississauga.

Click here for previous posts about Jane’s Walk >

Nature Walk along Humber River on October 18, 2015

As part of the reunion, we’ve organized a Humber River, starting at a point close to Old Mill Toronto for Sunday, October 18, 2015 starting at 10:30 am. The 30-minute walks ends at 11:00 am for the Brunch at Old Mill Toronto.

Deadlines: We need to know by Oct. 11, 2015 if you are planning to attend the Brunch.

Click here to access previous posts about the Humber River >

Click here to access previous posts about Old Mill Toronto >

Update

Just to let you know, in case you like to visit new places, a Sept. 21, 2015 Toronto Star article is entitled:

Expanded Sherway Gardens opens doors Tuesday: A $550 million expansion includes 50 new stores, more parking and a new food court that can seat more than 1,000

[End of update]

 

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