Search Results for: richard j. evans

My father’s photo album from 1936 Berlin Olympics drives my interest in reading Richard J. Evans’ trilogy about Nazi Germany

I have long been pondering how to approach the writing of a post about my late father’s 1936 Berlin Olympics photo album. The photo on the right was taken in Tartu, Estonia in 1936 or earlier. The photo, which is available … Continue reading

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Narrative helps us understand Germany in the 1930s (Richard J. Evans, 2003)

In his first work in a trilogy about Nazi Germany, Richard J. Evans discusses the role of narrative in the writing of the history of Germany in the 1930s. Peter Burke, in History and Social Theory, Second Edition (2005), notes that … Continue reading

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Posted in Newsletter, Story management | 2 Comments

As residents, neighbourhoods, and societies, we become what we imagine ourselves to be

The concept that we become what we imagine ourselves to be (or what we pretend ourselves to be) is from a quote in a book by Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. The concept also brings to mind a line from William Blake, … Continue reading

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Posted in Autobiography Stories - J. Pill, Commentary, Language usage, Newsletter, Story management | 1 Comment

When I visit the USA, I adopt the mindset of “the foreign correspondent”

Update As noted in a comment at the end of this post, the flippant tone of my review of the Chicago Tribune “gentrification” article is perhaps not warranted. Accordingly, a tentative bottom line that occurs to me, influenced by the … Continue reading

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Posted in Commentary, Language usage, Newsletter, Story management | 5 Comments

Storytelling: Getting attention; playing the role; collaboration

This post concerns three key features or elements of storytelling. At a previous post, I have noted some insights that have occurred to me regarding storytelling. Some subsequent posts are entitled: CBC The Current podcast: We are natural storytelling machines, not statisticians … Continue reading

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Posted in Mississauga, Newsletter, Toronto | 3 Comments

In Search of the Third Man (2000) provides a back story for The Third Man (1949)

For several weeks I’ve been reading In Search of The Third Man (2000) by Charles Drazin. I’ve also viewed the DVD entitled The Third Man (1949) – The Criterion Collection. The latter Third Man DVD is available at the Toronto Public … Continue reading

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Posted in Newsletter, Toronto | 1 Comment

Marjorie Harness Goodwin (2006) argues that more longitudinal studies are needed regarding gender differences in bullying

The Hidden Life of Girls: Games of Stance, Status, and Exclusion (2006) brings together decades of field research by Marjorie Harness Goodwin conducted from the vantage point of linguistic anthropology. The latter discipline deals with how what we say shapes the … Continue reading

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Military history mural at Small Arms Ltd. building in Mississauga

I much enjoy viewing the mural, related to military history, located at Dixie Road and Lakeshore Road East in Mississauga. This is an impressive and engaging work of art, presented in what I like to characterize as an open-air art gallery. … Continue reading

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Posted in Long Branch, Mississauga, Newsletter, Toronto | 1 Comment

Can the term neoliberalism be turned into a useful analytic tool?

Given my interest in how language interacts with perception, I enjoyed reading an overview, in Status Update (2013), of the history of neoliberalism. Boas and Gans-Morse (2009) In her discussion of neoliberalism in Status Update (2013), Alice E. Marwick cites a 2009 journal article … Continue reading

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The meaning of neoliberalism has changed dramatically since its origin in interwar Germany

The story of Long Branch (Toronto not New Jersey) began about 10,000 years ago when Palaeo-Indian nomadic hunters first arrived in Southern Ontario at the end of the last Ice Age. I enjoy imagining those times, and reading about the … Continue reading

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