Securing the future of heritage trees, second ed. (2011)

Securing the future of heritage trees: a protection toolkit for communities (2011) is based on work by the Ontario Heritage Tree Alliance. This publication, devoted to the topic of heritage trees, is available from the Toronto Public Library.

The publisher is the Ontario Urban Forest Council.

David Switzer

David Switzer

The discussion that follows includes comments from David Switzer.

I took this photo of David  (he’s wearing his bike helmet and rear-view mirror) when I met outside the Alderwood Library on April 13, 2012.

11 replies
  1. Fran
    Fran says:

    Glad you found the document on heritage trees. I worked on the publication of this toolkit. We updated the 2006 version which we published in 2011. We had given the former version as a gift to the Long Branch library and when I can I will drop off the newer version. I am impressed with the fact that work is being done to designate Long Branch as an Heritage Conservation District . Perhaps that work could include an identification of heritage trees in the area ~ this would no doubt add to its historical value. If you and/your team need help in this you could contact the Ontario Urban Forest Council directing your question to me hegilles@rogers.com. The definition of heritage trees can be found in the toolkit. At the moment any trees that we see as possibly having heritage value, we forward the information to Toronto Forestry which tags those trees until the city can produce a heritage trees protection bylaw. We would be interested in ongoing updates. Fran Moscall, OUFC Director

    Reply
  2. Jaan Pill
    Jaan Pill says:

    We much appreciate your message. The identification of heritage trees in the area has been suggested to us, in the context of the Heritage Conservation District designation process. We are very pleased that, as a result of your message, we know what steps are involved in such an identification process. We will keep you informed with updates and will be in touch with you regarding the identification process. Jaan Pill, President, Long Branch Historical Society.

    Reply
  3. David Switzer
    David Switzer says:

    I attended the presentation on heritage trees. More recently I was informed that there is no plans at city council to create a heritage tree protection. The city does have protection for the urban forest.

    Despite that, the best chance I know for heritage tree designation is in Marie Curtis Park were there are and I quote from study done for TRCA “over 150 species have been documented of which 24 are considered to be species of concern by TRCA including Butternut considered endangered and ancient Red Oak that date to the founding of York”. I would love to go with any of the local tree experts to locate these specimens and fill out the heritage documentations.

    Reply
  4. Jaan Pill
    Jaan Pill says:

    I look forward to working with you, David, to ensure that you have the opportunity to meet with local tree experts, to locate the specimens you have mentioned, and to fill out the heritage documentations.

    I am also pleased to say that Leslie Coates, of Parks, Forestry & Recreation, City of Toronto, has been in touch with Barry Kemp, Speaker Coordinator for the Long Branch Historical Society.

    She has confirmed that the speaker at the May 15, 2012 meeting of the society will be Peter Didiano, Supervisor, Capital Projects, Parks, Forestry and Recreation, City of Toronto.

    His topic: The Marie Curtis Park Project.

    Peter Didiano is involved with the current capital improvements at the park. The meeting will provide an opportunity for the community to discuss heritage tree designation prospects in Marie Curtis Park, among other topics of interest.

    The meeting starts at 6:30 pm on May 15, 2012 at the Long Branch Library, 3500 Lake Shore Blvd. West, located at Thirty Second Street and Lake Shore Blvd. West.

    As well, a reminder that at 10:30 am on Sunday, May 6, 2012, we will assemble at the east parking lot at Marie Curtis Park to begin the Long Branch Jane’s Walk extending from the park into South Long Branch, and ending at the Ontario Hospital Grounds.

    A second Long Branch Jane’s Walk will also be held that day, with a focus on a ‘Main Street’ perspective on Long Branch. That walk will proceed along Lake Shore Blvd. West.

    Reply
  5. Jaan Pill
    Jaan Pill says:

    John Danahy of the University of Toronto has given us permission to share his following comment:

    In terms of the heritage trees issue, I have been wondering how the ash borers will impact Long Branch and Lakeview. The red ash is one of the dominant local trees and some neighbourhoods could lose a significant percentage of their mature trees over the next few years. The red ash are pioneering species in southern Ontario and usually occur as “volunteers” and not formally planted so I find many experts and residents overlook the importance of these trees.

    Reply
    • Jaan Pill
      Jaan Pill says:

      Tim Dobson wrote my email. Here’s his message (he’s given permission for us to post it):

      I agree with John. Starting to plant replacement species in Long Branch is also a wise thing to do now – not wait for the other trees to come down. Plant new trees close to the older ones so they have time to establish prior to removal.

      Reply
  6. Jaan Pill
    Jaan Pill says:

    These are most interesting points, John. We will keep the topic of ash borers in mind as we research these topics.

    Reply
  7. David Switzer
    David Switzer says:

    I have white Ash that was planted by Leaf. I have received information on an injection program to attempt to save the tree until hopefully the infestation has been resolved either by intervention or as in many cases like this by a natural solution. I must decide whether to remove this fairly small tree and replace it or go to the expense of the injections which are not proven. Although I am aware of the situation I agree that many of the people do not know of the options even though there has been public meetings on the situation. My neighbour has a large ash and was not aware of the situations and because on the size of his tree much more money is involve. You might want consider using your position and contacts to promote awareness if this issue. It probable would have a more immediate benefit than the heritage trees.

    Reply
  8. Jaan Pill
    Jaan Pill says:

    I’ve receievd some additional suggestions regarding information gathering and will follow up on them.

    David Switzer has added:

    The best source for information on the ash borer is the LEAF web-sit and specially http://www.yourleaf.org./emerald-ash-borer and http://www.yourleaf.org/options-my-ash-tree. Leaf also recommend contacting the city for more information I went to one site that shows a map of the progress of the infestation. Last year it was in Mimico and moving towards us.

    Reply

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