New Search

If you are not happy with the results below please do another search

37 search results for: power speaks its own language

1

Power speaks its own language: Contemporary social media propaganda focuses on denigration of standard perceptions of reality

Click here for previous posts about propaganda > A previous post is entitled: Power speaks its own language: Can historiography (generally, the writing of history featuring standard language usage) teach us anything of value with regard to extreme violence? As a follow-up to the post, I refer to a Dec. 18, 2018 New Yorker article […]

5

To say that neoliberalism is totalitarian in its claims is a vague pronouncement; yet the basic concept warrants reflection and consideration

Germany’s Hidden Crisis (2016) Previous posts underline that power speaks its own language; such a language is not necessarily congruent with everyday language. In the language that power speaks, at times big is small, small is big, and inside is outside – in short, reality – including history – is what power says it is. […]

6

Empirical research and anecdotal experience appear to support power posing: Dec. 28, 2015 New York Times book review

Updates Click here for posts about Amy Cuddy’s research > A Nov. 3, 2016 Language and Cognition article is entitled: “Power in time: The influence of power posing on metaphoric perspectives on time.” [End]   In 1959, Erving Goffman introduced his theory of impression management. The concept of impression management in turn brings to mind discussions […]

7

Ghosts of Empire (2011) analyzes British imperialism from the perspective of its rulers

There was nothing liberal about the British empire, claims to the contrary notwithstanding. In Ghosts of empire (2011), Kwasi Kwarteng argues that “Britain’s empire was not liberal in the sense of being a plural, democratic society. The empire openly repudiated ideas of human equality and put power and responsibility into the hands of a chosen elite, drawn […]