Preserved Stories Blog


He once sued his tutors, alleging that they owed him money for everything he had taught them. He won.

The image is from the Politico article featured at the post you are now reading.

The image is from the Politico article featured at the post you are now reading.

An Oct. 7, 2017 Politico article is entitled: “Trump Is the Star of These Bizarre Victorian Novels:¬†And the Internet is losing its mind.”

The one problem with the headline is the expression “losing its mind.”

I refer you, in this context, to the YouTube video entitled:

Keys to our Past – Language & Stigma

Similarly, it is unfair to infants, toddlers, and 12-year-olds to compare Trump to infants, toddlers, and 12-year-olds.

We must take care how we use language.

Or, is it the case that “losing of one’s mind” is an okay figure of speech? I am reminded of the expression “boggle the mind,” popular in the 1960s. Are these terms noy okay to use? I imagine arguments can be advanced, either way.

The back story, at any rate, related to the above-noted video, one of a series in a Mental Health Film Series recently premiered at Humber College in Toronto, is available at a post entitled:

Well-received, well-attended Mental Health Film Series Premiere at Humber College Lakeshore

That said, the Oct. 4, 2017 Politico story is of interest, in particular in its exploration of the meaning of the word “bizarre.”

 

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