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Left-hand turns from Lake Shore to Long Branch Ave. and to Thirty Seventh present characteristic hazards

The sign is posted near the corner of Forty First St. and James St. in Long Branch. The view is toward Marie Curtis Park looking west along James St. Jaan Pill photo

The sign is posted near the corner of Forty First St. and James St. in Long Branch. The view is toward Marie Curtis Park looking west along James St. Jaan Pill photo

A previous post is entitled:

Beware when trying to cross east to west on the north side of Lake Shore Blvd. West at Park Lawn in Humber Bay Shores

Here are some additional notes, that have occurred to me:

It’s been noted that a left-turn light at Lake Shore and Long Branch would be beneficial. The same applies at Thirty Seventh and Lake Shore.

When driving west on Lake Shore, and seeking to make a left turn to go south on Thirty Seventh, there’s a particular visual scenario at play.

The TTC traffic island on Lake Shore, that a driver is looking toward when contemplating a left-hand turn from Lake Shore to Thirty Seventh, partially obscures traffic travelling west to east on the lane next to the south sidewalk on Lake Shore.

In a sense, when making such a turn, a driver may be “flying blind.” You may not know, until you have begun the turn, that an opposing car isĀ approaching you at high speed.

I recall this, as I remember seeing a situation where a driver made a turn from Lake Shore to go on to Thirty Seventh. As the turn was made, just as the light was turning red, a car was speeding west to east on the sidewalk-side lane on Lake Shore, with the aim of getting through before the light turned red.

The car turning south made it through the turn within a split second of the eastbound car passing through the intersection. The southbound car got through just in time, before the eastbound car sped through the same intersection. The cars missed colliding by about a metre.

I was, at that instance, as I recall, standing on the westernmost end of the TTC traffic island, having taken some photos looking south toward the Rexall building, which is the site of the former Eastwood Park Hotel. From that vantage point looking east, I had a clear view of the near-collision.

I reconstructed, in my mind, what the dynamics were, in this particular situation. Both drivers were keen to get through the light before it turned red. In their rush, neither was fully aware of the other driver.

As a rule, I avoid left-hand turns on Lake Shore in such circumstances.

 

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One Response to Left-hand turns from Lake Shore to Long Branch Ave. and to Thirty Seventh present characteristic hazards

  1. Jaan Pill Jaan Pill says:

    A comment at Facebook (with which I strongly agree) reads:

    I work downtown and see the same thing. I make a point of trying to make eye contact with those wanting to turn right or left before my foot hits the road. So far, so good.

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