August 5, 2013 Lakeview Waterfront Connection Information Displays at Marie Curtis Park focused on community engagement

I have been following the Lakeview Waterfront Connection Environmental Assessment project for some time.

Many other people are more involved with the details and more knowledgeable about the project than I am.  My role, as a volunteer, is primarily to offer one means, among many others, for residents to learn more about the project.

Communications and community engagement

I like following this project because the level of community engagement that is evident impresses me, as does the quality of the communications related to the project. Such things require plenty of thought and planning on the part of the management team.

I’m especially impressed by the fact that input from the community is indeed taken into account – in theory as well as in practice – in the development of the project.

Such things are a strong source of motivation for me, in my volunteer work in posting items of interest to my website.

I’m pleased that many visitors to the Preserved Stories website (as indicated by emails and site statistics) like to share their views about topics such as the sand beach between Etobicoke Creek and Applewood Creek.

Etobicoke Creek

Background about this project – and the waterfront areas affected by it – can be found in the Etobicoke Creek Category at the Preserved Stories website.

In the event you are new to the Etobicoke Creek story, the following post provides a quick overview:

The first engineered alteration of Etobicoke Creek began in 1929 to allow for the westward extension of Lake Promenade

Jane’s Walk

The May 2013 Jane’s Walks in Long Branch both began at the mouth of Etobicoke Creek:

Enjoyable and wide-ranging Jane’s Walk in Long Branch on May 4, 2013

Second Long Branch Jane’s Walk, on May 5, explored the Mississauga-Toronto border south of Lake Shore Blvd. West

The following post provides a quick overview of Jane’s Walks in Long Branch in recent years:

Pecha Kucha – 20 slides x 20 seconds = 6 minutes 40 seconds (Long Branch Jane’s Walk talk)

Photos from August 5, 2013 Information Display

In the current post, I’m pleased to share with you photographs of the August 5, 2013 Information Display in which staff from the Lakeview Waterfront Connection Environmental Assessment project shared information and engaged in conversations about the project with residents who attended the display at Marie Curtis Park.

On left: Janice Hatton is the Project Lead for the Lakeview Waterfront Connection representing the Region of Peel. On right: Alexis Wood is involved with the project on behalf of Toronto and Region Conservation. Jaan Pill photo

The Information Display featured a number of illustrations depicting what the waterfront will look like when a construction process of about seven years has been completed. In another post, I will share these images as JPEG files, along with an accompanying narration from the Lakeview Waterfront Connection project. Jaan Pill photo

Image from August 5, 2013 Information Display regarding Lakeview Waterfront Connection project. Jaan Pill photo

On left, facing camera: Alexis Wood of Toronto and Region Conservation. On right: Kate Hayes, Manager, Ecosystem Restoration, Credit Valley Conservation. Jaan Pill photo

Detail from Information Display. Jaan Pill photo

Jaan Pill photo

Jaan Pill photo

Jaan Pill photo

The Information Display was set up at a short ways east of the pedestrian bridge that crosses the current channelized version of Etobicoke Creek at Marie Curtis Park. Jaan Pill photo

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